Category: Inner Circle

How to Keep Your Team Engaged

August 31st, 2019
Every client is concerned about how to engage the team. Some executives are thinking about how to ‘keep good people’, others are thinking about how to enable ‘smart people to share what they know’, and still others know they need engagement to ensure customers are happy and bottom line business results occur.
According to Gallup, there is some positive news in that engagement is on the rise and is at an all-time high of 34%. With that said, there is such a long way to go to fully leverage already existing assets – our people! Time and again, the most successful companies actively engage employees in their work. The actively disengaged is down to 13% while ‘not engaged’ is 53%.
A few ideas to consider:
  • Tie each person’s work to the result (for the company, customer etc.) – Wouldn’t you like to know WHY you are doing something?
  • Take each employees’ ideas into consideration – Simply asking can go a long way if you truly care about the answer.
  • Don’t treat each employee the same – don’t we each have different goals and interests?
  • Are you developing your employees? – a little investment into your employees can go a long way.
  • Do you address poor performers? – one of the biggest issues we see if letting poor performers carry on. Everyone knows it and is less motivated. Why not just proactively address? Provide an opportunity and swiftly address if necessary.


Manufacturing Summit Recap: Innovation & Top Talent

August 27th, 2019
My videos from the Manufacturing Summit, had key themes along with insight into the exciting opportunities for the Inland Empire and advanced manufacturing and how it all tied in with LMA Consulting’s “2019 Predictions from Manufacturing & Logistics Executives” document.

 

I’ve included the quote from Roy Paulson, president of Paulson Manufacturing to kick us off on the state of manufacturing. As Roy says, US manufacturers are thriving and will continue to thrive, assuming they have a focus on innovation.
Innovation is one of the key themes that emerged from the keynote speakers at the summit from Fender and Tesla as well as through the innovation award winners. Going hand-in-hand with innovation is a focus on people. Listen to my recap about the summit and what’s relevant to manufacturers today:
As Lance Hastings, CEO of California Manufacturing & Technology Association said at the summit, the Inland Empire is thriving. There was greater growth in the Inland Empire than any other area of California.  However, far more impressive than that is that the IE beat out the nation (in a state that typically isn’t too keen on manufacturing).
The Brookings Institute agreed with the conclusion in their recent study on the Inland Empire. One of the key recommendations was to create a consortium for advanced manufacturing and logistics success. You’ll be hearing more about this exciting, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity in the coming months. In addition, Governor Newsom is supportive of this path forward and so we are ‘jumping on it’.
If you are interested in staying in the loop on this initiative, please email me so I can add you to the distribution list.


Talent Transformation: People or Robots?

August 23rd, 2019
As much as I’m seeing last month’s feature article on the bedrock topic of inventory continuing to ring true (clients are gaining more interest in reducing inventory levels to free up cash), the promise of technology (automation and robots) is enticing many clients to at least assess what they should be doing when it comes to the topic of the talent transformation. I cannot think of a client that doesn’t have some sort of a talent gap.
It appears as though this trend is only going to gain steam as more and more clients assess automation, AI, IoT and more to keep up with customer expectations, to try to address the squeeze on costs while also dealing with the lack of employees. As baby boomers retire (which I’m seeing at an increasing pace with some TOP talent), the gap is bigger than most executives realize. It turns out not all of the key information, decision-making capabilities and leadership abilities are easily absorbed by the next generation managers without a significant effort. What is worse is that if he/she gets fed up, you might not have a lengthy transition provided by the more dedicated baby boomers.
Our APICS Inland Empire Chapter had an executive panel discussion on just this topic at our spring symposium last April. I’m especially excited the vast experience of our diverse and experienced panel:
  • Navin Shetti – Director of Engineering, Honeywell Aerospace
  • Cindy Elliott – Global Go-to-Market Strategy, Manufacturing & Logistics, ESRI
  • Paul Granillo – CEO, Inland Empire Economic Partnership
  • Jerry Hsiung – Robotics expert, Carnegie Mellon & Harvey Mudd
  • Jermaine Waltemeyer – Recruiter/ Practice lead, Aerotek
To throw out a few ideas this month, which will definitely be supplemented and expanded upon in future months…..
  • Do NOT wait too long to consider which type of technology will add value to your ability to achieve your business strategy and objectives. Although there is something to be said about an organization that can perform manually, it will not achieve scalable, profitable growth in this Amazon-impacted business environment.
  • With that said, do NOT be a blind follower of your Board’s or Executive Team’s ideas. I have heard from countless clients that they outsourced when it was popular. Some have turned out great whereas others made no sense, didn’t make money and didn’t improve service. Can you afford to make preventable mistakes in this fast-paced world? Most likely NO!
  • Appreciate your hidden talent. 80% of the time, I find hidden talent at a client. They are typically underappreciated and utilized to 20% of their potential. If you’d like help in identifying them, contact us.
  • Find your internal best practice processes. Again, I find clients under appreciate best practices of certain departments, individuals or sites and instead focus a bunch of attention on bench marking to the industry. Do you really want to be average in your industry?
Put some thought into your talent pool, where it will be in 5 or 10 years and whether you are proactively addressing your situation to create sustainable and scalable growth.


Is Your ERP System Scalable?

August 14th, 2019

erp successSince we happen to be working on 3 or 4 ERP system projects concurrently, the topic of ERP is top of mind.

Let’s start by saying upfront that we turn down ERP selection project requests. Not everyone needs a new system. Perhaps a process upgrade and better utilization of your current system will sustain your business for 3-5 years. If so, why divert attention? On the other hand, waiting “too long” will quickly spiral into disaster. How do you know which of these is your situation?

An ERP upgrade is one of the most significant initiatives a company can undertake, and the statistics aren’t good. 80% fail to achieve the expected outcome! Yet, if your ERP system isn’t scalable, hiding your head in the sand will lead straight to unmitigated disaster. Thus, it’s best to be proactive, diligent and strategic when it comes to this topic.

Selecting a system isn’t something to delegate to your IT person. Instead, it is something you must “own”. After all, if your system will support your resources so that you can grow the business with the peace of mind that your system will enable a high level of customer service with additional customer-friendly capabilities (such as a customer portal), support your #1 asset (your employees and partners) behind the scenes and allow your business to scale with minimal if any investment of time and resources, it suddenly becomes quite relevant.

The 80/20 of success relates to just two items:

  • Your critical success factors – what is unique to your company or industry and/or what drives customer differentiation and profitability
  • Your design and implementation partners – although the focus typically goes to the software, as with business, the 80/20 of success is with people and partners.

Having an ERP system that supports your business objectives is another key component of creating a resilient supply chain. If you’d like a rapid assessment on whether your ERP system will support your growth and business objectives, contact us. And please check out our resilient supply chain webpage.



Do You Have a Resilient Supply Chain?

August 11th, 2019

supply chain strategyThere is extreme volatility in today’s end-to-end supply chain.  Are you keeping up with all the changes?  For example, think about the following:

  • Tariffs & trade impacts
  • Data & security breaches
  • The Amazon Effect
  • New technologies such as 3D printing
  • Natural disasters, port strikes and more

The Resilient Supply Chain
Instead of allowing each of these incidents to impact you, we must create a resilient supply chain.  Are you proactively thinking about these topics?

  1. Agility– Instead of seeing agile as an IT or project management concept, we should be thinking about how to incorporate agility into every step / every piece of our end-to-end supply chain.  If a customer changes his mind, are we flexible enough to handle it?
  2. Speed – Is your supply chain set up for speed?  Customers are unwilling to wait.  I’ve found that I’m unwilling to wait anymore.  If I wait for a trusted advisor, service provider, subcontractor or even a client, it delays LMA Consulting. For us to be on the leading edge with clients, we must be ahead of the curve; not waiting for something that will be obsolete before we get it!  That is one thing we appreciate about our webmaster; he is speedy and understands priorities which is how we are able to announce a major content upgrade (thanks Scott).
  3. Predictive – In today’s complex world, we must also be predictive so that we are prepared from an 80/20 standpoint for the most likely unexpected events, trends and bumps in the road.  Thinking three steps ahead can go a long way in creating resilience.
  4. Collaborative – One of key components to creating a resilient supply chain with multiple partners is to collaborate.  There is no time to establish relationships and find ways to navigate volatility together if you haven’t already set a collaborative tone.
  5. Adaptive team – No doubt; the core to resilience is having an adaptive team where each members understands where he/she is headed and feels empowered to handle obstacles as they arise.

Have you thought about each interrelated partner, piece or parameter in your end-to-end supply chain?  How can you set it up to be resilient?