Tag Archive: China

Coronavirus Spurs Supply Chain into Prominence

March 13th, 2020

The House of Representatives has launched a new Congressional Supply Chain Caucus. The coronavirus is spurring supply chain into the limelight. Because China is impacted, the effects to the supply chain will be felt throughout the world in 2-3 months (and sooner for countries closer to the source). We are already starting to see these effects. In addition, it is creating a panic resulting in virus-related supplies already being scarce. If nothing else, it is definitely highlighting the impact of the supply chain.

On a related note, listen to my video about the coronavirus where I talk about, establishing backup plans and future-proofing your supply chain. I’d love to hear about your situations, your ideas and plans so we can exchange ideas. Please email me.

What Should We Consider and/or What Impacts Could Arise?
The supply chain was already starting to gain prominence in the C suite. Since the supply chain is responsible for the vast majority of cost, it has always been relevant.  Now, it has gained in relevance as its impact on the customer experience has come to light. And, with disruptions like the coronavirus spread, the critical nature of the supply chain has been highlighted. We cannot leave our end-to-end supply chain to chance or we will be left in the dust at the first sign of disruption.

Instead, we should not only proactively look at backups but we should also diversify across countries/geographies, size companies, industries and more. We should build solid relationships to proactively and successfully navigate disruptions. In fact, we will be publishing the 10 ways to Keep Your Supply Chain Moving shortly. Stay tuned…

In the interim, keep focused. Don’t panic. Look for solutions.  Don’t be deterred by roadblocks. In essence, create a resilient supply chain. There are several ideas in our new LMA-i, LMA-Intelligence series including the Resilient Supply Chain and Future-Proofing.

Contact us if you’d like an assessment of how well you have future-proofed your manufacturing operations and extended supply chain.



Beware of New Data Law in China & Its Impacts

February 27th, 2020

According to the Epoch Times and International Business Attorney, John Tulac, China’s new cybersecurity law poses a big risk for anyone doing business in China. In essence, if you send data to or from China, your data can be audited at any time. It certainly is concerning from many standpoints such as intellectual property, trade secrets, and more. Listen to my short video on this new law and impacts to consider.

John and I talk about this law as well as many other topics related to doing business in China, alternatives to China and the new USMCA trade deal. Listen to our new interview in our Future-Proofing Manufacturing & Supply Chain series. Undoubtedly, you’ll pick up a few worries along with ideas/ potential solutions. Let us know what you plan to do.

What Should We Consider and/or What Impacts Could Arise?
Many of our clients do NOT import from China.  So you might be thinking, why does this apply to me? If companies start leaving China in a mass exodus, you will certainly be in competition for new manufacturing options such as Vietnam, skilled labor in the U.S. and Mexico, technical skills to automate, use 3D technology, etc. And this is before thinking about indirect impacts. If the supply chain moves away from China, where will it move? There could be dramatic impacts on ocean lanes, political unrest throughout the world, raw material supply and supply and demand. We have never met a client unconcerned about these topics. After all, profitable growth is the name of the game!

At a minimum, no matter whether your supply chain relates to China, we recommend you re-think your manufacturing operations and extended supply chain. Are you dependent on any core suppliers? Are you spread too thin among suppliers? How are you selecting suppliers? And that is just the first topic in a line of many when re-evaluating your end-to-end supply chain. How about the broader topics of whether your manufacturing and supply chain is agile? Fast?

Start by re-evaluating your manufacturing and supply chain road map and think through related impacts. These topics certainly relate to our new LMA-i, LMA-Intelligence series including the Amazon Effect, the Resilient Supply Chain and Future-Proofing and contact us if you’d like an assessment path-forward plan to accelerate your bottom line and customer performance.

 



Future-proofing Your Supply Chain

February 21st, 2020

Disruptions abound in supply chain circles. Just consider any of the following recent events: the tariff war, global unrest, the Coronavirus, natural disasters such as the volcano in the Philippines, the Hong Kong protests and more.

We have never had a client that could claim that 100% of the extended supply chain (from suppliers’ suppliers to customers’ customers) was inside the U.S. So, we have to be prepared to navigate these types of disruptions and the related impacts.

Disruptions certainly go beyond your physical supply chain. What about your human capital, technologies (accompanied with processes) and strategies? Refer to our article on future-proofing your skills gap and assess which risks might be on the horizon in your industry.

When it comes to technologies, there is no doubt that emerging technologies are gaining steam and are starting to transform supply chains. Just consider the application of collaborative robots, automation, RPA (robotic process automation), artificial intelligence, IoT, blockchain, and predictive analytics to name a few. Big name companies are dropping big dollars into these technologies. When thinking about strategy, remember strategy is no longer a multi-year exercise. We must be thinking in terms of strategic sprints. Who knows what will happen beyond a year out!

Several high-level categories should be assessed as you think about your supply chain:

  1. Sourcing – Are you sourcing from China? Is this a viable path forward to source 100% from China? There are increased risk factors to consider. Listen to an interview I conducted with John Tulac, international business attorney, on future-proofing and doing business with China. It is time to reevaluate your supply chain footprint.
  2. Logistics – There are significant disruptors transforming this industry, ranging from e-commerce and the the Omni-channel to robotics, additive manufacturing and the digitization of the supply chain. If you aren’t incorporating these impacts in future-proofing your supply chain, you will be left in the dust. These are concepts of focus for the consortium for logistics success in the Inland Empire to enable companies to stay informed and keep up with the fast pace of change.
  3. Manufacturing – Industry 4.0 is transforming manufacturing and changing the landscape. It will be a pivotal year that separates the winners vs the losers as advances are made. See what the National Association of Manufacturers’ Leadership Council sees as critical issues
  4. Demand & Supply – There is no doubt, there is a keen interest by business owners, executives and private equity leaders on creating predictable demand and forecasting sales. The more we understand our demand plan, the better our operational performance, supplier performance and customer performance. Read about SIOP (sales, inventory, operations planning) and how it can help future-proof this area.
  5. Inventory – As the disruptions abound and executives fear a slow-down, the proactive management of inventory and advanced collaborative programs are gaining in relevance. Pick up some tips and strategies in our recent article ” Inventory Management as Fashionable as Automated Intelligence for Distributors” for ACHR News.
  6. Metrics & Predictive analytics – Keeping a pulse on performance should remain a top priority while forecasting what will be needed.

Getting ahead of the curve might be the only avenue to success. Consider creating a resilient supply chain and future-proofing your supply chain. Stay tuned and read more about it, and If you are interested in discussing a supply chain assessment, please contact us.

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Made in Vietnam

Forget About Reducing Inventory; Perhaps You Have the Wrong Supply Chain Strategy



Are You Waiting Too Long to Future-Proof?

February 10th, 2020

Although most economists do not see an immediate recession, there are plenty of concerning signs along with global volatility. Unfortunately, concern alone can create a recession unrelated to underlying factors. Meaning, we could have terrific fundamentals and results yet still go into a recession if fear takes over! I wouldn’t want to be dependent on avoiding fear in the marketplace. Would you?  This is why it’s important to future-proof manufacturing operations and the extended supply chain!

The worst thing you can do is wait for a recession to act. It is similar to a natural disaster. For example, when my house burned down in a fire, I was fortunate that it was an isolated incident. I was able to find alternate housing nearby while the house was rebuilt. I was also able to gain priority with a builder, etc. Instead, if I was caught in one of the devastating California fires, I would be one of many people struggling with the aftermath. Of course, I would be a pebble in a sand quarry in that case. The same is true would be true with a recession, global unrest or a natural disaster. Have you thought through how you will continue operations to satisfy customer demand?

One Tip to Implement This Week:
We’ll make this quite simple: Stop and determine if you have backup plans at a minimum.

Think through the following:

  1. Sources of supply
  2. Resources, skills and trusted advisors who support the business
  3. Operations
  4. Logistics infrastructure
  5. IT and ERP system infrastructure

What are you going to do about it? Are you willing to invest in future-proofing? I’d be willing to bet that any executive willing to make prudent investments in future-proofing might have to take a temporary ‘hit’ with the initial investment but will surpass the competition by a minimum of 10 fold in the future.

For example, one of our clients thought about what they should do to get ahead – not just survive. When the competition was increasing capacity in China, our client was moving out of China and into Vietnam. They were ahead of the curve and had far less roadblocks and bottlenecks along the way to overcome. There is definitely something to be said about being early to the party and leading the way.

Think about taking a calculated risk to lead instead of follow. In today’s Amazon-impacted world, you cannot afford to be a follower!

 



U.S., China Sign Historic Phase One Trade Deal

February 3rd, 2020

According to the National Association of Manufacturers press release, the U.S and China trade deal is an unprecedented phase one win for manufacturers.  Previously the NAM CEO lamented that “China has proven one of the most troubling markets in the world for manufacturers, due to its lack of commitment to free markets, fair competition and reform.” Thus, this statement was high praise for the deal, “It is a remarkable turning point for manufacturers, with the unprecedented and enforceable commitments on critical intellectual property protections to which China has agreed.

There are a myraid of issues in trade with China for manufacturing, and there is debate whether “phase one” went far enough or too far (as both extremes exist); however, according to my recent discussions with international business attorney and China expert John Tulac on future-proofing your manufacturing supply chain, there is quite a bit of risk in China to navigate.

What Should We Consider and/or What Impacts Could Arise?

Certainly this trade deal relates back to tariffs. Of course, the U.S. agreed to cut tariffs of $120 billion in Chinese goods by half. They also held off on tariffs in December with expectation of the trade deal. Not surprisingly, economists expect this to positively impact growth.

According to a Wall Street Journal article, China agreed to ramp up purchases of U.S. goods and services by $200 billion over the next 2 years. Agricultural products will go up by $32 billion over that period, and China agreed to steps that will provide market access for dairy products, poultry, beef and more.

Most importantly to many manufacturers, there is strong language preventing thefts of trade secrets. That is certainly a huge frustration to manufacturers! We definitely aren’t too comfortable relying upon this but it can be seen as progress and eases some concerns. There is also agreement to create a dispute resolution office as well as to not manipulate currency. The bottom line is there is a host of positive outcomes and progress which provides a base to build upon.

By no means should we jump on expanding manufacturing in China as there are plenty of issues of concern. With that said, this trade deal might provide time for you to evaluate what will make the most sense for your business objectives while reducing negative impacts of tariffs. As costs have gone up in China and working capital increases in importance, manufacturers are starting to look at moving operations closer to customers to support quick turnarounds and a superior customer experience. Technology might provide a strategic advantage with 3D printing, AI, IoT, robotics and more. Commodity products with minimal freight costs are moving to other low cost countries. For example, Vietnam loves manufacturing and is rapidly expanding. There are plenty of options to ponder.

At a minimum, continually re-evaluate your supply chain road map and think through related impacts. These topics certainly relate to our new LMA-i, LMA-Intelligence series including the Amazon Effect, the Resilient Supply Chain and Future-Proofing and contact us if you’d like an assessment path-forward plan to accelerate your bottom line and customer performance.