Tag Archive: communications

Memphis, Sun Studio & Following Your Heart

June 25th, 2018

 

I made a quick stop in Memphis since I was nearby and had never experienced the birthplace of rock’n’roll – and, from all appearances, some amazing fried foods.  Of course, I had to do the typical tours of Graceland (including seeing Elvis’ vast automobile collection and private plane) and Gibson guitars; however, I was most impressed by the tour of Sun Studio.  See a few shots of the memorabilia below.

 

 

 

 

 

Sun Studio is the place many greats were discovered including Elvis, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Roy Orbison and more.  The owner, Sam Phillips discovered these amazing talents by stopping them from playing for him – and what they thought he would want to hear.  Instead, he asked them to play what they love and follow their heart. Are you performing for your boss, your Board or you?

One tip to implement this week: Passion
Think about the question – are you following your passion/enjoy what you do?  Or, can you incorporate some elements of your passion into what you do? I have no doubt you can!  Just think a bit longer about how you can incorporate some aspects of your passion – the imagery, in metaphors, etc.  There is always a way to add some aspect into your daily routine.

And how about the question Sam asked – are you performing specifically for your boss?  Can you include some aspect of what you enjoy in your communications? Similarly to Elvis and Johnny, undoubtedly, you’ll improve your chances of that next promotion, innovation or BIG discovery by being yourself.

Wouldn’t that be more pleasant – and potentially more successful?



My Late Aunt Marge & the Art of Conversation

October 14th, 2017

I've Been Thinking

Last week, my Aunt Marge passed away, one month shy of her 96th birthday. My dad, brother and I went to surprise her for her 90th birthday. She was so very excited to see my dad. Aunt Marge had a gift for the art of conversation and could make mundane topics seem compelling. I remember visiting my aunt and uncle over the years, and my mom was typically deep in conversation with my aunt about all sorts of family members and whatever else was going on. Since I was the only girl, I could sit and participate with them sometimes too, and it was engaging conversation. There are some people with a gift for making everything seem intriguing, and that was my aunt. Who wouldn’t benefit from having that skill?

One tip to implement this week:

Certainly, it can be a challenge to develop the gift of conversation overnight; however, you can make progress. I remember when I first started consulting – I would definitely NOT profess to be any any sort of expert; some might argue I was fairly weak in this area. After all, I was focused on achieving results for my clients and didn’t have any idea how to participate in “small talk”. I should have asked my lovely aunt for advice!

I tried a few networking groups because I knew it was a good idea but I didn’t know how to start a conversation. I distinctly remember one event where I stood around the food line because at least it was a way to not stand all by myself at a “networking event”. Fast-forward several years later and I lead all sorts of groups, am well-known throughout the area, and connect people everyday (and love it). I would have never have suspected that not only would I be able to connect people outside of my specific area of expertise but that I also would enjoy it immensely!

No matter your skill level in conversation, you can improve. Start by focusing on the other person. That alone can go a long way. Be interested. Look for ways to provide value. Find people like my aunt and pay attention to what they do and say – and how they do it. Try their techniques in your own way. Ask for feedback. And last but not least, start telling yourself that you are improving and good at conversation. I distinctly remember that I used to think I wasn’t a good networker until one day when I read or heard advice to stop that. So, I started saying I was good at networking, and it became true. You’ll believe what you tell yourself! I am no ‘Aunt Marge’ yet, but I have my own style.

 



My ProVisors Ontario Group’s 5 Year Anniversary and Amazing Business Connections

October 2nd, 2017

I've Been Thinking

I am the Group Leader for the ProVisors (a top notch group of trusted advisors to business executives and owners) Ontario. Last week, we celebrated our 5 year anniversary – aren’t we a sharp-looking group! HUNDREDS of referrals and business connections later, we continue to be quite successful and have increased the value we provide to our collective clients. I know my clients have benefited.

Provisors Ontario

When I joined ProVisors as a member, I truly had no idea how I would provide introductions and facilitate connections to some of the members. Their professions just didn’t seem to arise much in my consulting profession. Fast-forward seven years and I LOVE to be able to connect people. I can’t remember the last time I received even the most obscure request where I couldn’t find someone, who knows someone, to meet the need. Talk about the value of connections!

One tip to implement this week: 

Take stock of your connections. Start by making a simple list of the people you know. Think about everyone: alumni connections, trade association connections, work connections, personal life connections, service providers etc. I bet you know more people than you realize. If your list feels light, make a concerted effort to meet a one or two people this week and get to know them professionally and add them to your circle.

Next, look for a way to provide value to five of your most valued connections – perhaps one a day. At a minimum, pick up the phone and give them a call. That will spur ideas on how to create value or, perhaps, you’ll have an idea right on the spot during the phone call. Often, the simple act of the phone call demonstrates that you care and goes a long way. Do the same thing the following week. I bet you’ll be surprised how it evolves! Keep me posted and tell me about your networking successes.

 

Read more about the benefits of quality business relationships.

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Styx and the Power of Positivity and Enjoying Your Career

September 27th, 2017

I've Been Thinking

Last week, I attended a Styx concert at the L.A. Fair – what a powerful event! The band has been around for 45 years and still enjoys singing together! It was totally apparent watching the concert. They really took the positive spin on their commentary and truly enjoyed singing their classics such as my favorite, “Come Sail Away”. Since I started on a quest to see some of the “greats” while they were still singing over the last few years, I have some performances to compare. Thus, it is obvious that although all of the classics sang their greatest hits, Styx stood out in enjoying their greatest hits. What a difference loving your job can make! Take a look at the grand finale…

Styx in Concert at the L.A. Fair

Styx in Concert at the L.A. Fair – the grand finale!

One tip to implement this week: 

Why not take a positive attitude to your job or career – after all, you probably spend more time doing that than anything else! Try putting a positive spin on whatever happens this week at work and see what happens. You might find that it is a lot more enjoyable. You also might find that there are some interesting people you hadn’t really noticed before. Take a genuine interest and let me know how it goes. If it still happens to be miserable, perhaps you should get out. No job is worth misery!

One way to seek out positivity: “catching your colleagues doing something right”. Recognize them. Beyond your colleagues, perhaps look for where your manager or boss or a board member has gone out of his/her way to make a situation better. Appreciate it. Now for the hardest of all – look for where your most annoying team members (no matter their position) are doing something right. I wouldn’t be surprised if 80% of us have a much better week this week after this exercise! Let me know in the comments.

Read more about promoting a positive work culture…

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Even The Best System Will Fail Without Talent

September 8th, 2017

As an ERP expert, it is quite clear to me that even the best systems will fail miserably if they don’t possess talent. Don’t even bother to select and implement an ERP system if you don’t have the “right” people on the bus. Start with executive support and continue on down through every position – everything is a team effort.

Teamwork is everything

It’s paramount in business to have the “right” people at the table.

Since we’ve worked with many clients on ERP projects, it is crystal clear what impact people will have on your business’s success. Throw out the notion that ERP is a technical topic! Instead, start thinking of it as a transformation initiative of substantial importance to business success.

Talent Leads the Way to Success

There are countless ways in which talent will affect success. To name just a few:

  • The sales team at the ERP software provider. Let’s start with the people selling the system. If they aren’t geared to educate you on their system and its fit, you can be sold “a bill of goods”.
  • The implementation team at the ERP software provider – there is little as important as the particular resources you partner with to implement your system. Set it up sub-optimally and you’ll have enduring issues.
  • Your ERP team – since ERP can be such a time intensive process, the temptation is to assign non-integral people to the team since the day-to-day must carry on; however, this team is designing your future!
  • Your executive sponsors – these folks are in a critical position to understand the status, make critical decisions, consider the fit with strategy, supplement resources as required and much more. It is not for the faint of heart!

If you’d like to ensure success with your ERP system, you’ll START by considering the people.  Put more time and thought into your talent. As much as or more than you put into evaluating functionality and you’ll be grateful down-the-line.

 

Did you like this article? Continue reading on this topic:

Why ERP Success Has Little to Do with Systems