Tag Archive: CSCP

Participation is More Fun

June 20th, 2019

During my recent trip to Sicily, Prague and Belgium, I went on several food tours. I have found food tours can be a fun and interesting way to get to know an area, as well as the food that is unique to the area. So, of course, when in Italy, what better than to have a food tour and make your own pizza! We sort of participated in making limoncello which is always a great taste to include on a tour.  And, we definitely made chocolate treats on a chocolate tour in Brussels.

Each time an activity was included, it added a new twist to the food tour. Isn’t that true with work as well? If you want someone to learn a concept, develop an exercise or a way for him/her to participate. Since returning, I taught a CSCP (certified supply chain professional) class at the Target distribution center and another class with two students at the University of LaVerne/  We had interesting interactive discussions. The students brought up real world examples to participate and relate the concepts to everyday work scenarios and gain immediate advice on a few issues. Bringing concepts to life with active participation is much more memorable than just talking or droning on about a topic. How can you bring concepts to life at work?

One tip to implement this week:
Think about how to build clarity and build participation into your conversations, presentations and discussions. As Jerry Seinfeld says, “I will spend an hour taking an eight word sentence and editing it down to five.” Similarly, I’ve noticed it might take our team at least that long to distill one key concept into a graphic. It is well worth it if the point is clearly communicated and our recommendation is understood and supported. In this case, think about how to engage your team, audience or client to participate in the solution. Not only will they understand it much better but they also will be aligned with it!

There is an art to developing participation exercises that will engage the audience while achieving your end outcome. I find it much harder than it appears. Ask your favorite speakers, educators and leaders how they do it. Take note when someone does it well. How do they introduce the exercise? How do they engage the team? Do they tie the results to the next topic or business need? Little things go a long way. For example, try making your exercise relevant to the audience. When explaining the importance of bills of material for a clay company, we used play dough to make some simple items (thanks to my colleague Diane Garcia for that great idea!). I’d love to hear your ideas for successful participation.

 



Why Supplier Management is More Important Than You Think

June 17th, 2019

Supplier management has been a theme this week. I taught a CSCP (certified supply chain professional) class session about supplier relationship management and SRM software recently. An attendee had a great example of the impact of poor quality.  Her company was sending an entire container load of product back to Asia with defective parts.  This was bound to have negative impacts on the customer. After all, they were already delayed.  Now, they were spending another month on the water to start over again. That led us to discussions on backup suppliers.

Next, I spent quite a bit of time on webinars and calls one day talking about the critical importance of supplier lead time, reliability, safety stock, lot size and how these factors impact our ability to maximize service, profit and cash flow. And, I presented to APICS Ventura on “The Resilient Supply Chain” We had intriguing discussions on the trends of vertical integration, supplier consolidation, allocation of key materials (and how consumer products are gaining priority access with the leftovers being allocated to industrial companies), the impact of tariffs on sourcing, and several more topics.

The bottom line of each of these discussions is that proactive management of suppliers is of ever-increasing importance in today’s Amazon impacted business environment. If you don’t have what you need, when you need it, where you need it, in good quality, and within cost guidelines, you are likely to lose vs. your competition. And, this includes last minute changes! Do you consider your supplier your partner or someone to negotiate with and gain an advantage over?

What Should We Consider and/or What Impacts Could Arise?
It is NOT all about cost. Of course, the hot topic on executives’ minds is how to achieve scaleable growth, so profit and cost are important topics.  Yet, smart executives realize it is quite easy to sacrifice the future by saving pennies in the present. Similar to the mistakes made several years ago when it didn’t matter whether it made cost-sense or not (ie. Boards were demanding outsourcing regardless of the financials), many Boards are demanding supplier concessions without looking at the extended supply chain impacts. Instead, stick up for looking at total cost and taking the value viewpoint! Of course, this means you’ll be focused on costs but it won’t be your sole focus.

We talked about several scenarios where you had to invest financially upfront in order to achieve longer-term success. For example, we talked about keeping a more expensive backup supplier and giving them 20% of the volume. Boards and private equity backers weren’t too happy with the extra cost yet this risk mitigation technique saved the day on more than one occasion. When the material went on allocation, the main supplier struggled or the ports/transportation infrastructure broke down, those who planned for the inevitable bump in the road had uninterrupted supply from the backup supplier and satisfied customers while the competition fell further behind. Are you thinking about your suppliers like a cost or a partner?  You’ll find more information on these types of topics on our resilient supply chain series.

 



LMA Consulting Group’s Lisa Anderson Is a Panelist for Drucker Supply Chain Forum

March 24th, 2017

Drucker Supply ChainLisa Anderson MBA, CSCP, CLTD, known as The Manufacturing Business TransformerSM and president of LMA Consulting Group, to participate as a panelist at the Drucker Supply Chain Forum to be held on Monday, March 27, 2017 at The Peter F. Drucker Center for Supply Chain & Logistics, Claremont Colleges. Anderson, a sought after speaker on supply chain, customer service, skills gap, ERP, SIOP, and the Amazon Effect and its impact on business operations of manufacturers and distributors, will participate in the “Professional Pathways in Supply Chain” panel at the Forum.

Anderson was recognized as a top 20 supply chain influencer by SAP, is board approved in supply chain strategy, was named a top 100 supply chain blogger on SupplyChainOpz and is soon to release a new book “I’ve Been Thinking: Strategies to Make and Keep Bold Customer Promises and Profits ” based on her weekly insights of leadership, customer service, supply chain, manufacturing and process improvement tips.  Anderson has also recently earned her APICS Certificate in Logistics, Transportation and Distribution (CLTD) in addition to her APICS Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP) designation. As a panelist at the Drucker Supply Chain Forum, Anderson will share her experiences and discuss the unique challenges and broad skill set required in the field of Supply Chain Management.

“I’m excited to participate on the “Professional Pathways in Supply Chain” panel at the Drucker Supply Chain Forum.   This panel applies equally well to students and professionals as there is an unprecedented need for strong supply chain talent in the marketplace,” explains LMA Consulting President Lisa Anderson. “The end-to-end supply chain has become more complex, global and cornerstone to growth and profitability in companies; thus, top supply chain talent has become a differentiator to success.  As a former VP of Operations and Supply Chain for a mid-market manufacturer who has been consulting with diverse industries for the last 12 years, I’m looking forward to sharing what I’ve learned along the way and discussing the future of the supply chain professional.”

LMA Consulting Group helps growing companies elevate business performance while creating a customer service edge. Through a number of proven proprietary processes, LMA Consulting Group can pinpoint areas for improvement with eagle eye precision and develop the strategies to deliver results. Anderson, also known as The Manufacturing ConnectorSM, is currently working on a book entitled “The Amazon Effect” detailing a business roadmap to thriving in an ultra-competitive marketplace. A regular content contributor in topics including supply chain, ERP and SIOP, she has been interviewed for articles in publications like Industry Week, tED Magazine and the Wall Street Journal. She actively posts educational blogs three times weekly and has three newsletters, Profit through PeopleSM and “I’ve Been Thinking” and “Supply Chain Briefing”.

Join the Discussion on Supply Chain

To register for the event click here or cut and paste this link into your browser https://www.eventbrite.com/e/drucker-supply-chain-forum-tickets-32833595167. For information about Lisa Anderson, go to https://www.lma-consultinggroup.com/ or call 909.630.3943.