Tag Archive: disruptions

What’s Going On Around the World?

July 11th, 2020

After receiving questions from multiple people about “What’s going on in Asia?”, we dug into what’s going on around the world (at a high level). In today’s globally-connected world, it isn’t a question you can ignore!

Starting with Asia, from a supply chain point-of-view, product continues to move. All three China ports are open and the volume has picked up. China’s capability was back up to at least 80% of the pre-coronavirus levels. However, once China started ramping up after the first infection wave, N.A. and Europe were under lockdown, impacting customer requirements. According to CEOs from across the U.S., they experienced delays initially but it is largely back to ‘normal’. On the other hand, we are also hearing that some folks are experiencing extended lead times. It certainly can depend on the product, material, specific supplier, etc.

Customers that switched supply to Vietnam prior to coronavirus have experienced high levels of service and are generally happy. While there aren’t a lot of numbers coming from Vietnam, it appears as though manufacturing has largely carried on to the levels needed. Of course, if you were in process of transitioning to Vietnam when coronavirus hit, it probably has been put on hold. India shut down for a month during coronavirus but started up essential manufacturing early in the ramp up. India hopes to ramp up manufacturing as companies accelerate the de-risking process from China whereas Vietnam is already in that position and hopes to expand. Japan and South Korea largely carried on through coronavirus. The only noteworthy disruptions were caused by shortages of supplies from their extended supply chain. Overall, there were initial delays with Asian supply, and the degree varied quite significantly based on the source of supply.

With that said, there are increasing levels of concern about a second wave of coronavirus hitting the Asian supply chain. Beijing has been in lockdown with surging cases of coronavirus. Although not integral to the supply chain, it is a bad sign of potential negative impacts to come. It is recommended to bring inventory in ahead of the holiday season and to be cautious with paying cash upfront as several small and medium size Chinese suppliers are struggling.

In Europe, it varied significantly by country. German manufacturers kept operating throughout the coronavirus lockdown. Since they saw the virus coming from what happened in Asia, they implemented social distancing and other protocols throughout rapidly. Certainly, Spain and Italy were impacted more severely and shutdown for a period of time. Several European and U.K. car manufacturers shutdown due to lack of demand and significant disruption in the supply chain. Aerospace companies in the U.S. experienced issues receiving essential components from Europe during the pandemic. Overall, CEOs across the U.S. said that supply from Europe wasn’t interrupted significantly.

U.S. manufacturers of essential products were largely able to continue producing. Of course, depending on the customers’ served, volumes dropped dramatically and disappeared (suppliers to hospitality for example) or experienced aggressive growth (lawn and gardening, toilet paper, PPE).  However, on average, volume dropped to 50-70% of the pre-coronavirus levels. CEOs from multiple industries have said the biggest issue has been disruptions in the supply chain. There are examples of essential U.S. manufacturers experiencing issues receiving materials/component parts from Mexico, Europe and Asia. Not every country had the same definition of essential. Consequently, there is a lot of talk about regional manufacturing and reshoring.

Brazil has been hard hit with the coronavirus recently, and manufacturers have been forced to shutdown. No part of the world has escaped this pandemic! Thus, the global supply chain has come into the forefront and is taking a seat at the table. Are you going to chase your supply chain or build appropriate diversification and flexibility and identify acceptable levels of risk upfront in your strategy discussions?

We are seeing a surge of supply chain strategy assessment and roadmaps. Are you evaluating your supply chain so that you can take charge of your future? There is no such thing as no risk.  Understanding your customer profiles, changing customer requirements and associated product supply strategies is a place to start. If you’d like to discuss your strategy, please contact us.

 

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Manufacturing Expert, Lisa Anderson, Predicts Proactive Approach to Demand and Diversification of Supply is Key to Future-Proofing Manufacturing and the Supply Chain

May 27th, 2020

CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA – May 27, 2020 –  Manufacturing and Supply Chain Expert,  Lisa Anderson, MBA, CSCP, CLTD, president of LMA Consulting Group Inc., predicts that a proactive understanding of customer demand and diversification within the supply chain will prevent a next round of guffaws as the effects of COVID-19 disruptions to the supply chain begin to subside and the world faces the uncertainty of the return of COVID-19. LMA Consulting Group works with manufacturers and distributors on strategy and end-to-end supply chain transformation to maximize the customer experience and enable profitable, scalable, dramatic business growth.

The importance of the supply chain took front and center stage as the COVID-19 pandemic raged throughout the world. “The wrong products were in the wrong places at the wrong time. From bumper crops of vegetables, eggs and other foodstuffs to the infamous toilet paper capers, consumers became very aware of the fine balance within the worldwide supply chain.  Crops and dairy products originally destined for restaurants soon saw their demand disappear while grocery stores had to limit demand to keep up. Hoarding of consumer paper goods like toilet paper and paper towels caused weeks’ delay in replenishments.  And, after nine weeks of shortages, manufacturers are still having challenges in aligning demand with supply,” stated Ms. Anderson.

The key is future proofing the supply chain so that it is resilient to disruptions.  That requires taking a proactive approach to putting strong secondary and tertiary backups in place for every element within the supply chain.  “The supply chain is both simplistic and complex. It is all about satisfying the customer, even before they know what they want.  The complexities start when managing equally important priorities.  From developing strong relationships with core suppliers and identifying customer buying patterns to forecasting inventory needs to satisfy demand, the details are many, balanced with having the right products in the right place at the right time for the right price, all while being profitable. COVID-19 has highlighted that even if your supply chain is complex, it also must be nimble,” she continued.

“We’ve seen the consequences of wringing too much out of the supply chain.  The winners have been those manufacturers who had strong relationships with multiple suppliers, good insights into customer demand, multiple options for transportation and dedicated teams willing to pivot to new ways of doing business to keep and expand the business. We have seen new business opportunities emerge and stalwarts struggle. The good news is that we have, once again, rallied to a challenge,” she said.  The video conferencing tech explosion, brick and mortar retailers becoming online behemoths to satisfy at-home demand and manufacturers retrofitting production lines to make ventilators and sanitizers have demonstrated the strength, innovation and ingenuity of manufacturing during a crisis. “Now, it’s time to take what we have learned and quickly adapt it to the new un-normal.  Manufacturers are already making inroads with new suppliers, forming unusual partnerships to expedite progress, building speed and resiliency into their operations, pursuing industry 5.0 and reshoring production closer to ever-changing customer demand. As much as these initiatives sound proactive and thorough, they are not enough. Manufacturers need to get ahead of the curve and create disruption to thrive in this new un-normal she concluded.

Ms. Anderson recently released, Future-Proofing Manufacturing & the Supply Chain Post COVID-19, an eBook that provides practical go-forward insights, advice and experiential value for manufacturers and their supply chains.

 About LMA Consulting Group – Lisa Anderson, MBA, CSCP, CLTD

Lisa Anderson is the founder and president of LMA Consulting Group, Inc., a consulting firm that specializes in manufacturing strategy and end-to-end supply chain transformation.  She focuses on maximizing the customer experience and enabling profitable, scalable, dramatic business growth. Ms. Anderson is a recognized Supply Chain thought leader by SelectHub, named a Top 40 B2B Tech Influencer by arketi group, 50 ERP Influencer by Washington-Frank, a top 46 most influential in Supply Chain by SAP and named a top woman influencer by Solutions Review. She recently published, I’ve Been Thinking, 101 strategies for creating bold customer promises and profits. A regular content contributor on topics including a superior customer experience with SIOP, advancing innovation and making the supply chain resilient, Ms. Anderson is regularly interviewed and quoted by publications such as Industry Week, tED magazine and the Wall Street Journal.  For information, to sign up for her Profit Through PeopleTM Newsletter or for a copy of her book, visit LMA-ConsultingGroup.com.
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Media Contact
Kathleen McEntee | Kathleen McEntee & Associates, Ltd. | p. (760) 262 – 4080 | KMcEntee@KMcEnteeAssoc.com



Future-proofing Your Supply Chain

February 21st, 2020

Disruptions abound in supply chain circles. Just consider any of the following recent events: the tariff war, global unrest, the Coronavirus, natural disasters such as the volcano in the Philippines, the Hong Kong protests and more.

We have never had a client that could claim that 100% of the extended supply chain (from suppliers’ suppliers to customers’ customers) was inside the U.S. So, we have to be prepared to navigate these types of disruptions and the related impacts.

Disruptions certainly go beyond your physical supply chain. What about your human capital, technologies (accompanied with processes) and strategies? Refer to our article on future-proofing your skills gap and assess which risks might be on the horizon in your industry.

When it comes to technologies, there is no doubt that emerging technologies are gaining steam and are starting to transform supply chains. Just consider the application of collaborative robots, automation, RPA (robotic process automation), artificial intelligence, IoT, blockchain, and predictive analytics to name a few. Big name companies are dropping big dollars into these technologies. When thinking about strategy, remember strategy is no longer a multi-year exercise. We must be thinking in terms of strategic sprints. Who knows what will happen beyond a year out!

Several high-level categories should be assessed as you think about your supply chain:

  1. Sourcing – Are you sourcing from China? Is this a viable path forward to source 100% from China? There are increased risk factors to consider. Listen to an interview I conducted with John Tulac, international business attorney, on future-proofing and doing business with China. It is time to reevaluate your supply chain footprint.
  2. Logistics – There are significant disruptors transforming this industry, ranging from e-commerce and the the Omni-channel to robotics, additive manufacturing and the digitization of the supply chain. If you aren’t incorporating these impacts in future-proofing your supply chain, you will be left in the dust. These are concepts of focus for the consortium for logistics success in the Inland Empire to enable companies to stay informed and keep up with the fast pace of change.
  3. Manufacturing – Industry 4.0 is transforming manufacturing and changing the landscape. It will be a pivotal year that separates the winners vs the losers as advances are made. See what the National Association of Manufacturers’ Leadership Council sees as critical issues
  4. Demand & Supply – There is no doubt, there is a keen interest by business owners, executives and private equity leaders on creating predictable demand and forecasting sales. The more we understand our demand plan, the better our operational performance, supplier performance and customer performance. Read about SIOP (sales, inventory, operations planning) and how it can help future-proof this area.
  5. Inventory – As the disruptions abound and executives fear a slow-down, the proactive management of inventory and advanced collaborative programs are gaining in relevance. Pick up some tips and strategies in our recent article ” Inventory Management as Fashionable as Automated Intelligence for Distributors” for ACHR News.
  6. Metrics & Predictive analytics – Keeping a pulse on performance should remain a top priority while forecasting what will be needed.

Getting ahead of the curve might be the only avenue to success. Consider creating a resilient supply chain and future-proofing your supply chain. Stay tuned and read more about it, and If you are interested in discussing a supply chain assessment, please contact us.

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What’s Ahead for Supply Chain?

January 18th, 2019

To think about what’s ahead in supply chain, it is important to put it in perspective with what’s ahead in business.  Read our article, What’s Ahead in Business? for details on the key trends impacting business:

  • Importance of the customer experience
  • Taking the holistic view has become a “must”
  • Volatility is the new norm
  • The coming power of manufacturing and supply chain

Given these trends, we predict our most successful clients will be thinking about these themes in the end-to-end supply chain:

  1.  Manufacturing is the Place to Be: Manufacturers are uniquely positioned to thrive. I have to say, I love that manufacturing is getting its due. According to NAM, for every $1 spent in manufacturing, $1.89 is added to the economy which is the highest multiplier of any economic sector.  
  2.  Distributed Inventory Management will be Key to Manufacturing Success: In today’s Amazon-impacted business environment, the customer expects rapid, low cost delivery. Given that the “last mile” has also become “last minute” with customers changing their mind frequently, predictive, distributed inventory management has become a differentiator.   
  3.  Additive Manufacturing will Rise to the Top: Customers want customized products on the fly. Yet, distributors cannot stock everything near every manufacturer, end user and the like. 3D printing can achieve this goal.
  4.  Customized, Rapid Delivery with Amazon-like Service and Efficiency is the Norm: In addition to additive manufacturing, re-shoring and near-sourcing (locating close to customers) are viable solutions to achieve Amazon-like service. The question is how to be efficient, cost effective and visible while serving customers.
  5.  Amazon Prime for Manufacturers is More than a Pipe Dream:  Subscription based models are becoming relevant to manufacturing, just as to Netflix and ERP systems. According to my friend, colleague and author Robbie Baxter, the membership model is just as relevant in manufacturing in transitioning from a one transaction/one-way communication to an ongoing relationship with the customer with a constant stream of feedback.  
  6.  We are Moving to a Digitized Supply Chain:  To address customers’ elevated expectations while continuing to make a profit, manufacturers and supply chain organizations are moving to a digitized supply chain. Artificial intelligence, IoT, the smart factory, robots and more. Don’t embrace technology as a fad.  Instead, embrace technology as a way to achieve a result.
  7.  To succeed, We Must Create a Resilient Supply Chain: Disruptions and volatility abound. Customers expect more. Boards expect more. People are harder to find and retain. Creating a resilient supply chain enables a proactive response to the current environment.

What will you do to get ahead of the curve in the New Year?

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E-Commerce Drives Industrial Space to New Heights

June 21st, 2018

Supply Chain Briefing

According to the Journal of Commerce, e-commerce is driving industrial space rents to new heights.  Our clients are definitely experiencing the same dilemma! There has been a 12.1% increase in rental rates since 2017, and the L.A. / Long Beach area has the lowest vacancy rate in the U.S. of 1.2%.  Ridiculously, the average price in L.A. was 60%+ higher than the U.S. average in the first quarter! And, stranger yet, e-commerce is driving class B space (not as desirable) to be snatched up. It is becoming the new class A!  Even Class C (even less desirable) is starting to sell like hotcakes.

Are you prepared for these Amazonian type disruptions?

 

What Should We Consider and/or What Impacts Could Arise?
First, are you thinking about the disruptors most likely to impact you?  For example, almost every manufacturer and distributor is certainly impacted by Amazon’s rapid delivery expectation.  Have you thought about what your customers expect from you? How about what is required to satisfy – or delight – them?  Undoubtedly, the bar has been raised.

Speed is a more apparent Amazon-related outcome.  Don’t stop there. In order to support rapid deliveries, what will be needed now?  Six months from now? A year from now? Currently, it has made proximity to the ports and customers of utmost importance.  What other impacts have arisen? In this case, e-commerce has changed our shipping and transportation expectations dramatically and permanently – we expect to receive only exactly what we need (whether 1 box or 1 piece) when we need it.  

This has created the need for e-commerce fulfillment operations.  Where would you prefer to locate your operation? Most likely as close to customers and your supply base as possible.  In this case, it means rates are going through the roof – if you can even get them. What can you do to proactively set up your supply chain to support these likely impacts?  And, are you building these estimates into your projections? How will you make effective decisions – can you bring your suppply chain into the process further?

Don’t delay any further….