Tag Archive: industry

Where Our Best People Are Going

September 1st, 2020

In the last month, almost every client has had some sort of challenge with talent. Most clients and contacts have lost a high-quality person. All have experienced a lack of talent or the appropriate skills to meet customer demand. For example, finding temporary resources has proven quite the challenge. Watch our video on what we’re seeing in the market. Are you paying attention?

 

       

One Tip to Implement This Week:
Since people are on the move, there is NO DOUBT that we must get on top of our human resources. We cannot prevent people leaving because they want to change careers or industries, but we can prevent those who are leaving due to leadership. After all, people don’t leave companies, they leave people!

The good news is that you can improve this situation immediately.

Focus on your people.

  1. Have you clearly communicated where you are headed?
  2. Have your leaders talked with each direct report individually about how he/she fits into the future?
  3. Do you have a performance check-in process quarterly, at minimum?
  4. Are you providing career advancement? Ex. promotions, additional responsibility, training and/or mentoring, etc.
  5. Are you upfront with your people? Communicate what you are able to communicate. Tell them what you cannot communicate but make sure they know you will tell them immediately as you are able. Anytime leaders keep things from employees, employees make up FAR worse stories. Good people exist. Weak people stay and become disgruntled.
  6. How effective are your leaders?
  7. Of course, this assumes you are taking care of the basics such as safety, quality, COVID, etc.

Read more about navigating and successfully emerging post COVID-19 in my free eBook Future-Proofing Manufacturing & Supply Chain Post COVID-19. Please send your feedback and stories. I will incorporate them in an article, video or interview.



Forget About Reducing Inventory; Perhaps You Have the Wrong Supply Chain Strategy

December 16th, 2019

Clients and colleagues have demonstrated a heightened interest in inventory reduction recently despite not yet seeing the full value! Certainly with everyone worried about a potential recession in 2020, they are starting to think about not tying up as much cash in inventory but that is not the 100 pound gorilla. The real question is why we are thinking about corporate mandates and full warehouses instead of seeing the bigger picture – reevaluating our supply chain.

Of course, maximizing your customer service (on-time delivery, quicker lead times), margins/efficiencies and cash flow (inventory reduction) is an important standard best practice. To learn more about how to achieve this win-win-win, read our recent article ” Inventory Management as Fashionable as Automated Intelligence for Distributors” for ACHR News. Yet, it could become “rearranging chairs on the titanic” if your supply chain is not set up to deliver maximum performance. So, instead of jumping to erroneous conclusions, take a step back to reevaluate your end-to-end supply chain strategy.

When I was a VP of Operations & Supply Chain for a mid-market manufacturer, our private equity backers and Board of Directors were always asking about labor costs. It didn’t matter that labor costs was our smallest cost element. In fact, material cost was the 800 pound gorilla at around 70% of product cost, followed by freight. If we could double labor cost to reduce materials and freight, it would be a smart decision. Yet, it was never viewed that way. So, if a smart private equity group and executive team can bark up the wrong tree, we all might be speeding down the freeway but going in the wrong direction.

Typically, labor cost is 8-12% of the total cost of ownership. How does that compare to your materials cost? Unless you are in a labor-intensive industry, perhaps you better take a second look. Next there are freight costs. Not only do freight costs continue to rise but the rules, regulations and delays can be astounding. In a recent California Inland Empire District Export Council (CIEDEC) meeting, the new sulfur emission rules for shipping arose because costs will have to be passed on to importers and exporters. Of course, we don’t have to mention tariffs and global unrest. Now, let’s add inventory carrying cost into the equation. It is a minimum of 6%.  Yet, most experts (and clients) agree that it is truly a minimum of 25% and could be as bad as a 1:1 ratio. Just think about how often your customer changes his mind, all the expediting you have to do to serve customers and the systems and complexity your team has to manage. Is it time to reevaluate?

ERP system
Let’s not forget that this equation isn’t just an insource or outsource question. There are lots of opportunities. For example, you might want to think about the following questions:

  1. Where are your customers?
  2. Where are your suppliers?
  3. Is there disruptive technology that could impact your cost ratios?
  4. How complex is your supply chain? Have you thought about the price of complexity?
  5. Do you have a robust ERP system to support customer expectations while achieving profitable growth?
  6. Are there supply chain partner programs that could completely change the game?

No matter your situation, it is worth revisiting. Corporate strategies last NO MORE than a year so why are we leaving our supply chain to old rules? Instead, we should be future-proofing our manufacturing and supply chain business.

Stay tuned and read more about it If you are interested in discussing a supply chain assessment, please contact us.

Did you like this article?  Continue reading on this topic:

Top Trending Client Request: Reduce Inventory

What’s Ahead for Supply Chain?

The Strongest Link in Your Supply Chain



A Once-in-a-Lifetime Opportunity for Manufacturing, Logistics & CA to Align

July 15th, 2019

Last week, I went to the California Capitol building as a part of the Inland Empire Economic Partnership’s (IEEP) regional leadership academy. It was interesting to hear how the process works. I also am also representing the IEEP’s Logistics Council as it relates to moving forward with the Brookings report recommendations to create a consortium of logistics and advanced manufacturing excellence in the Inland Empire.

We are positioned ideally to scale up and partner with industry, academia and government/non-profit partners to achieve this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity of aligning seemingly disparate goals of manufacturing, logistics, California government and the federal government’s interests to achieve a win-win-win-win. Wouldn’t that be a feat!

The idea is simple. The Inland Empire’s predominant high-paying professions include logistics and manufacturing. The IE has been outpacing all of California in job creation due to these industries yet they are not typically supported (to say the least!). Since they are contributing vitally to the IE community and jobs, we have the cards stacked in our favor:

  • IE logistics is #1 in the U.S.
  • IE manufacturing is strong and vast (SoCal is #1 in manufacturing in the U.S.)
  • The IE has access to great talent in the local and surrounding area universities (CSUSB, UCR, Drucker, Harvey Mudd, Cal Poly, Redlands), community colleges (Norco, Chaffey etc.), and partners such as GA Tech
  • And, the IE is in the unique position to leverage advanced technology to increase customer value, improve profit and create clean technologies as a win for the environment, X.

Thus, we are scaling up and collaborating for success.

This opportunity didn’t just fall into the IE’s lap. The leaders saw potential and ‘went for it’. Are you looking for opportunities?

One tip to implement this week:
In our work with clients, it is commonplace for clients to ignore vast opportunities such as this exciting initiative. There are always roadblocks, different interests, money flows to address and lots of other issues that arise. The key question is whether you are looking at each issue as a detriment or if you see the big picture and train your eye to ‘see’ a successful path forward.

Recently, our APICS Inland Empire chapter had the opportunity to provide training and education to Target (thanks to our partnership with the University of LaVerne). When the opportunity arose, we didn’t know how we would scale up and fulfill it successfully. However, we took the leap of faith to create value and had the confidence that we’d figure it out.

At first, we were worried about executing against our commitments.  Yet, it all fell into place. It forced us to be a bit more creative.  So, when the next leap of faith opportunity arose to provide manufacturing and logistics education to high school students to help bridge the gap to a profitable career, we went for it. We continue to evolve as we go but it has allowed us to make a difference in a way we would never had pursued or been involved with previously. Are you taking a leap of faith?



How Resilient Are Your People?

January 17th, 2019

We would be remiss if we went too far down-the-path with supply chain resiliency without pointing out that the ONLY way you’ll have a resilient supply chain is if you have resilient people.  Similar to building a house, without a solid foundation, the best accessories will fail to “hold up” over the long haul without that solid foundation.  Your team is your foundation.  Would you be willing to have your business hang in the balance if your team’s ability to “hold it up” would make or break success?  Hopefully so!

Here are a few questions to think about to determine how comfortable you are with your foundation:

  • If your competition offered your employees slightly more money, would they jump ship without much thought?
  • Are your people willing to take a risk if they know the decision will help move the company forward?
  • Are your people willing to disagree with you?
  • Are your people willing to try new ideas, even if they fail?
  • If a customer presses your people about an issue, will they blame it on “them” or will they take responsibility to resolve the issue quickly regardless of whether it has anything to do with them?
  • If changing market conditions dictate they should follow a new course that isn’t popular or approved, will they bring it up?
  • What do they say to your customers and suppliers when you aren’t listening?

Every executive at our Harvey Mudd executive roundtables and on the APICS-IE executive panel pointed out the relevance of culture and your people on business success.  Technical topics are abuzz but the REAL buzz is who has the strongest team as they will speed on by the competition and be the most resilient as the economy turns, the industry changes, a disruptor emerges etc.  With this fresh perspective, it pays to think again about your team and the priority you give it.



The Importance of Continual Learning

September 18th, 2018

Recently, we updated our website.  It prompted a lot of thinking about many aspects of business.  One is the importance of continual learning.  As you’ll see on our Continual Learning webpage, it is a priority.  With that said, I’ve noticed that the most successful people (clients, colleagues, fellow Board members etc.) have continual learning in common.  There is definitely something behind this trend!  It reminds me of one of our LMA Advocate winners, Valerie Ladd – her continual learning is quite impressive.  She never stops learning – and all with a positive attitude to boot.

 

 

 

 

When thinking about continual learning for LMA Consulting, we focus on three categories:

1) Future trends in business, the economy, the industry, our area of expertise etc.
2) Technology trends & disruptors
3) Local & global trends.

What are you learning?

One tip to implement this week:
There are countless ways to add or expand on your continual learning.  Instead of getting stuck in a sea of possibilities, just choose one or two and start there.  Don’t worry if they are the best ones or will provide the greatest benefit.  Just start!  Waiting for perfection is a LONG road….your competition will certainly pass you by.

With that said, if you’d like some ideas of where to go for continual learning, here are several that pop to mind:
1) Ask your mentor.
2) Talk with colleagues and ask what they are learning – or ask to learn more about their role and challenges.
3) Go to a trade association meeting.  For example, APICS Inland Empire provides programs, symposiums, tours and education to provide value to manufacturing and distribution professionals.
4) Go to an alumni meeting.
5) Attend a local chamber or business club.
6) Read the news, magazines and blogs related to your field.
7) Call a customer or supplier.
8) Join a mastermind.
9) Call a former colleague or manager.
10)  Attend a tradeshow.

What are you going to do?