Tag Archive: John Tulac

Beware of New Data Law in China & Its Impacts

February 27th, 2020

According to the Epoch Times and International Business Attorney, John Tulac, China’s new cybersecurity law poses a big risk for anyone doing business in China. In essence, if you send data to or from China, your data can be audited at any time. It certainly is concerning from many standpoints such as intellectual property, trade secrets, and more. Listen to my short video on this new law and impacts to consider.

John and I talk about this law as well as many other topics related to doing business in China, alternatives to China and the new USMCA trade deal. Listen to our new interview in our Future-Proofing Manufacturing & Supply Chain series. Undoubtedly, you’ll pick up a few worries along with ideas/ potential solutions. Let us know what you plan to do.

What Should We Consider and/or What Impacts Could Arise?
Many of our clients do NOT import from China.  So you might be thinking, why does this apply to me? If companies start leaving China in a mass exodus, you will certainly be in competition for new manufacturing options such as Vietnam, skilled labor in the U.S. and Mexico, technical skills to automate, use 3D technology, etc. And this is before thinking about indirect impacts. If the supply chain moves away from China, where will it move? There could be dramatic impacts on ocean lanes, political unrest throughout the world, raw material supply and supply and demand. We have never met a client unconcerned about these topics. After all, profitable growth is the name of the game!

At a minimum, no matter whether your supply chain relates to China, we recommend you re-think your manufacturing operations and extended supply chain. Are you dependent on any core suppliers? Are you spread too thin among suppliers? How are you selecting suppliers? And that is just the first topic in a line of many when re-evaluating your end-to-end supply chain. How about the broader topics of whether your manufacturing and supply chain is agile? Fast?

Start by re-evaluating your manufacturing and supply chain road map and think through related impacts. These topics certainly relate to our new LMA-i, LMA-Intelligence series including the Amazon Effect, the Resilient Supply Chain and Future-Proofing and contact us if you’d like an assessment path-forward plan to accelerate your bottom line and customer performance.

 



U.S., China Sign Historic Phase One Trade Deal

February 3rd, 2020

According to the National Association of Manufacturers press release, the U.S and China trade deal is an unprecedented phase one win for manufacturers.  Previously the NAM CEO lamented that “China has proven one of the most troubling markets in the world for manufacturers, due to its lack of commitment to free markets, fair competition and reform.” Thus, this statement was high praise for the deal, “It is a remarkable turning point for manufacturers, with the unprecedented and enforceable commitments on critical intellectual property protections to which China has agreed.

There are a myraid of issues in trade with China for manufacturing, and there is debate whether “phase one” went far enough or too far (as both extremes exist); however, according to my recent discussions with international business attorney and China expert John Tulac on future-proofing your manufacturing supply chain, there is quite a bit of risk in China to navigate.

What Should We Consider and/or What Impacts Could Arise?

Certainly this trade deal relates back to tariffs. Of course, the U.S. agreed to cut tariffs of $120 billion in Chinese goods by half. They also held off on tariffs in December with expectation of the trade deal. Not surprisingly, economists expect this to positively impact growth.

According to a Wall Street Journal article, China agreed to ramp up purchases of U.S. goods and services by $200 billion over the next 2 years. Agricultural products will go up by $32 billion over that period, and China agreed to steps that will provide market access for dairy products, poultry, beef and more.

Most importantly to many manufacturers, there is strong language preventing thefts of trade secrets. That is certainly a huge frustration to manufacturers! We definitely aren’t too comfortable relying upon this but it can be seen as progress and eases some concerns. There is also agreement to create a dispute resolution office as well as to not manipulate currency. The bottom line is there is a host of positive outcomes and progress which provides a base to build upon.

By no means should we jump on expanding manufacturing in China as there are plenty of issues of concern. With that said, this trade deal might provide time for you to evaluate what will make the most sense for your business objectives while reducing negative impacts of tariffs. As costs have gone up in China and working capital increases in importance, manufacturers are starting to look at moving operations closer to customers to support quick turnarounds and a superior customer experience. Technology might provide a strategic advantage with 3D printing, AI, IoT, robotics and more. Commodity products with minimal freight costs are moving to other low cost countries. For example, Vietnam loves manufacturing and is rapidly expanding. There are plenty of options to ponder.

At a minimum, continually re-evaluate your supply chain road map and think through related impacts. These topics certainly relate to our new LMA-i, LMA-Intelligence series including the Amazon Effect, the Resilient Supply Chain and Future-Proofing and contact us if you’d like an assessment path-forward plan to accelerate your bottom line and customer performance.

 

 

 



Go Global, the Export Opportunity

October 12th, 2018

95% of consumers are outside of the United States.  Thus, there is VAST opportunity in export – and it isn’t as hard as you think.  

Last week, I spoke at the Riverside County College of Foreign Trade’s Go Global event with Elizabeth Warren on export and global logistics.  There was a lot of excitement about the potential in export.  We talked about cultural differences and opportunities in China, Hong Kong, Africa and Europe, along with simplifying the complexities of global logistics, as the 80/20 boils down to starting with the best partners.  Have you considered exploring export?

 

What Should We Consider and/or What Impacts Could Arise?
Exploring export is quite doable.  There are events such as Go Global.  You can participate with APICS Inland Empire and other trade associations who host tours of manufacturers who are successful exporters.  Ask your commercial banker to refer you to their international division. They are likely to have valuable resources.  Talk with your local manufacturing groups such as MCIE and Riverside County Manufacturers and Exporters.  Contact us and we’ll refer you to international trade resources such as export/trade research, government resources, an international attorney, international marketing and global logistics resources.

We know of multiple manufacturers who have “made their name” and grew their business by focusing on export.  Even if you only want to supplement a robust U.S. marketplace, since we are living in a global, interconnected world, why not at least explore the opportunities in your industry?  You’d be surprised at some of the success stories – exporting successfully to challenging countries, navigating challenging global trade and logistics issues, etc.

Although there is a BIG world out there, you could start close to your country of origin such as Canada and Mexico if you are U.S. based.  Whether NAFTA changes and evolves or not, it is still a great opportunity and one of the best advantages for U.S. companies according to John Tulac, a top notch international business attorney.

Interested?