Tag Archive: manufacturing

What’s Going On Around the World?

July 11th, 2020

After receiving questions from multiple people about “What’s going on in Asia?”, we dug into what’s going on around the world (at a high level). In today’s globally-connected world, it isn’t a question you can ignore!

Starting with Asia, from a supply chain point-of-view, product continues to move. All three China ports are open and the volume has picked up. China’s capability was back up to at least 80% of the pre-coronavirus levels. However, once China started ramping up after the first infection wave, N.A. and Europe were under lockdown, impacting customer requirements. According to CEOs from across the U.S., they experienced delays initially but it is largely back to ‘normal’. On the other hand, we are also hearing that some folks are experiencing extended lead times. It certainly can depend on the product, material, specific supplier, etc.

Customers that switched supply to Vietnam prior to coronavirus have experienced high levels of service and are generally happy. While there aren’t a lot of numbers coming from Vietnam, it appears as though manufacturing has largely carried on to the levels needed. Of course, if you were in process of transitioning to Vietnam when coronavirus hit, it probably has been put on hold. India shut down for a month during coronavirus but started up essential manufacturing early in the ramp up. India hopes to ramp up manufacturing as companies accelerate the de-risking process from China whereas Vietnam is already in that position and hopes to expand. Japan and South Korea largely carried on through coronavirus. The only noteworthy disruptions were caused by shortages of supplies from their extended supply chain. Overall, there were initial delays with Asian supply, and the degree varied quite significantly based on the source of supply.

With that said, there are increasing levels of concern about a second wave of coronavirus hitting the Asian supply chain. Beijing has been in lockdown with surging cases of coronavirus. Although not integral to the supply chain, it is a bad sign of potential negative impacts to come. It is recommended to bring inventory in ahead of the holiday season and to be cautious with paying cash upfront as several small and medium size Chinese suppliers are struggling.

In Europe, it varied significantly by country. German manufacturers kept operating throughout the coronavirus lockdown. Since they saw the virus coming from what happened in Asia, they implemented social distancing and other protocols throughout rapidly. Certainly, Spain and Italy were impacted more severely and shutdown for a period of time. Several European and U.K. car manufacturers shutdown due to lack of demand and significant disruption in the supply chain. Aerospace companies in the U.S. experienced issues receiving essential components from Europe during the pandemic. Overall, CEOs across the U.S. said that supply from Europe wasn’t interrupted significantly.

U.S. manufacturers of essential products were largely able to continue producing. Of course, depending on the customers’ served, volumes dropped dramatically and disappeared (suppliers to hospitality for example) or experienced aggressive growth (lawn and gardening, toilet paper, PPE).  However, on average, volume dropped to 50-70% of the pre-coronavirus levels. CEOs from multiple industries have said the biggest issue has been disruptions in the supply chain. There are examples of essential U.S. manufacturers experiencing issues receiving materials/component parts from Mexico, Europe and Asia. Not every country had the same definition of essential. Consequently, there is a lot of talk about regional manufacturing and reshoring.

Brazil has been hard hit with the coronavirus recently, and manufacturers have been forced to shutdown. No part of the world has escaped this pandemic! Thus, the global supply chain has come into the forefront and is taking a seat at the table. Are you going to chase your supply chain or build appropriate diversification and flexibility and identify acceptable levels of risk upfront in your strategy discussions?

We are seeing a surge of supply chain strategy assessment and roadmaps. Are you evaluating your supply chain so that you can take charge of your future? There is no such thing as no risk.  Understanding your customer profiles, changing customer requirements and associated product supply strategies is a place to start. If you’d like to discuss your strategy, please contact us.

 

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Eagle Eye Strategic Focus

Innovation & Technology During the Coronavirus Pandemic?



Manufacturing Expert, Lisa Anderson, Forecasts U.S. Manufacturing Resurgence COVID-19 Showcased Technology and Innovation as Key Contributors

June 30th, 2020

CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA – June 30, 2020 –  Manufacturing and Supply Chain Expert,  Lisa Anderson, MBA, CSCP, CLTD, president of LMA Consulting Group Inc., forecasts a resurgence of manufacturing in the U.S.  LMA Consulting Group works with manufacturers and distributors on strategy and end-to-end supply chain transformation to maximize the customer experience and enable profitable, scalable, dramatic business growth.

“The COVID-19 pandemic turned the supply chain on end.  It forced manufacturers to rethink their strategy, their products and their future.  Those who took the time to identify opportunities and used this unique circumstance to leverage technology and innovate are already seeing results. Innovation has always been the key driver to manufacturing success.  We are now seeing it pay off, and, it’s just the beginning,” stated Ms. Anderson.

Innovation has opened not only new product possibilities for manufacturers, but also new relationships for cost reductions and improving the customer experience.  From suppliers and 3-D printing to transportation options due to reshoring, manufacturers have an abundance of opportunity for differentiation and growth.

“China has fallen from favor not only due to COVID-19 and the supply chain disruption, but also because of the arduous policies they implemented early in the year which essentially removed all protections of intellectual property and patents. There has been talk about doing more business with Mexico, but Mexico is best at assembly,” she said.  Manufacturing shifted to China and other countries due to high labor costs in the U.S.  Technology and robotics have leveled U.S. manufacturing costs.  “It clearly comes down to innovation and leveraging technology. U.S. manufacturers are strong and smart.  Sometimes it just takes an extra push or, in this case, an event to force out-of-the-box thinking,” she concluded.

Ms. Anderson recently recorded another video in her What’s Happening in Manufacturing & the Supply Chain series highlighting Reshoring.

 About LMA Consulting Group – Lisa Anderson, MBA, CSCP, CLTD

Lisa Anderson is the founder and president of LMA Consulting Group, Inc., a consulting firm that specializes in manufacturing strategy and end-to-end supply chain transformation.  She focuses on maximizing the customer experience and enabling profitable, scalable, dramatic business growth. Ms. Anderson is a recognized Supply Chain thought leader by SelectHub, named a Top 40 B2B Tech Influencer by arketi group, 50 ERP Influencer by Washington-Frank, a top 46 most influential in Supply Chain by SAP and named a top woman influencer by Solutions Review. She recently published, I’ve Been Thinking, 101 strategies for creating bold customer promises and profits. A regular content contributor on topics including a superior customer experience with SIOP, advancing innovation and making the supply chain resilient, Ms. Anderson is regularly interviewed and quoted by publications such as Industry Week, tED magazine and the Wall Street Journal.  For information, to sign up for her Profit Through PeopleTM Newsletter or for a copy of her book, visit LMA-ConsultingGroup.com.                                        


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Media Contact
Kathleen McEntee | Kathleen McEntee & Associates, Ltd. | p. (760) 262 – 4080 | KMcEntee@KMcEnteeAssoc.com



The Future of Manufacturing & Supply Chain

June 17th, 2020

It is a very exciting time for those of us passionate about manufacturing and supply chain. Undoubtedly, we have never worked harder proactively managing the unprecedented demand and supply volatility, and so appreciate your supply chain resources. I am hearing that they are taking off for better opportunities, and you won’t want to lose your best talent during what will be a lengthy and supply chain intensive COVID-19 recovery!

As manufacturing increasingly returns to the U.S., as consumers and businesses expect a superior, customized, rapid delivery of products and services, as technological advances become commonplace, as the general public sees the value of essential businesses and the diversity of manufacturing and supply chain, it will be a great ride! Are you shaping your future or waiting for it to happen to you? Join me in a webinar to hear more.

One Tip to Implement This Week:

Simply start thinking about the future of manufacturing and supply chain in your industry, your region, and as they relate to technological advances and innovation. Bring your team together to get them thinking about the future, new ideas, and how to proactively position your company for success. A LOT can be accomplished simply by refocusing attention to thinking proactively, creatively and with a focus on the future. Will there be opportunities to pick up new business, design new products and open new markets as firms want to bring manufacturing capability back to the U.S. and closer to customers? What do your customers need that they haven’t thought about yet that would help them be more successful?

 

 Listen to a panel discussion with manufacturing executives related to the electronics industry on the Future in Manufacturing panel to stimulate ideas and flip through my eBook, Future-Proofing Manufacturing & Supply Chain Post COVID-19 to gain new insights to get the ball rolling. We have also launched a rapid Future-Proofing Manufacturing & Supply Chain assessment if you’d like assistance in thinking through your particular situation. Contact us if you are interested. Stay safe and healthy.



Being Featured on Bloomberg & the Rise of Reshoring

June 3rd, 2020

Of course, it was very exciting to be featured on Bloomberg’s ‘What’d You Miss?’ show! It speaks to the rising popularity of reshoring that Bloomberg is searching for supply chain experts to talk about reshoring and whether it makes sense.

NOTE: I am about half-way through the segment if you’d like to watch the show.

As I said on Bloomberg, of course, the answer of whether you should reshore is “it depends”; however, it is becoming quite attractive for many industries and situations. At a minimum, review whether it makes sense to source manufacturing closer to your end customers. If you need a push, look no further than the Amazon-like customer requirements, increasing labor costs in China, the lessening importance of labor costs as the Future in Manufacturing panel discussed, the risk of disruption (tariffs, COVID-19, natural disasters etc.) and more. I discuss this topic in depth in my eBook, Future-Proofing Manufacturing & Supply Chain Post COVID-19.

 We have also launched a rapid Future-Proofing Manufacturing & Supply Chain assessment if you’d like assistance in evaluating for your particular situation. Contact us if you are interested. Stay safe and healthy. We continue to post coronavirus resources, write blog articles on navigating coronavirus as well as “beyond lockdown” strategies, and we are sponsoring APICS Inland Empire‘s “Navigating Through Volatility” webinar series. Join us and learn more here



The Future of Manufacturing

May 30th, 2020

 

I was on a panel of a webinar, The Future of Manufacturing with Andrew Zanelli, president of VCC, Michael Knight, president TTI Semiconductor Group, and Seth Denson, co-founder of GDP Advisors. It was a lot of fun, and we talked about the coronavirus, reshoring, cost leadership, innovation, and other topics. Are you interested in what the future might look like and how you can position your company and career successfully?                                         

What Should We Consider and/or What Impacts Could Arise?

There is no doubt there is a renewed interest in reshoring and sourcing manufacturing closer to the customer. All panelists agreed that labor cost has reduced significantly in terms of relevant factors to consider in evaluating manufacturing and supply chain strategy.

  1. China’s labor costs have continually risen, leading progressive companies to move to Vietnam and other Asian countries to chase lower labor costs if labor is a significant factor in total cost of their products. Mexico is gaining steam as well as the latest statistics show their fully burdened labor costs are often lower than China.
  2. Advances in technology have reduced the labor component in the total cost of products, sped up the turnaround time and enabled greater customization on demand. Robotics, additive manufacturing, automated equipment, autonomous vehicles are just a few of the advances.
  3. The time component is increasing in importance in today’s environment where Amazon-like customer service is the norm. Lengthy lead times will lead to a loss in customer demand.
  4. Although cash is always king, during the pandemic, it has risen in importance. Product tied up in the supply chain which is typically 3 months minimum for Asian supply to the U.S. equates to dollars tied up that cannot be invested elsewhere.
  5. There is a higher likelihood of disruption the further away production is from customer demand and the more steps to the supply chain (such as ports, trucks, sailing through unfriendly waters).

Whatever was true last quarter or last month is no longer true. Continually reevaluate your end-to-end supply chain requirements. I’ve addressed this topic as well as your strategy, priorities, key trends, and your restart recipe for success in my eBook,  Future-Proofing Manufacturing & Supply Chain Post COVID-19. If you are interested in a rapid assessment, please contact us.