Tag Archive: partners

Last Mile Has Become Last Minute & the GE Port Optimizer

December 10th, 2018

 

There is no doubt – last mile has become last minute, meaning every customer changes his/her mind.  Whether it is due to consumer preference or supporting an industry that seems rather known (For example, it is clear what will be purchased to build a 737 airplane.  You don’t change that end item at the last minute.), when looking down the supply chain, no matter how clear, it all gets jumbled and becomes “last minute”.  

Thus, the key is to understand where your product is within the extended supply chain, when it will be available and where you sit in terms of the priority customers. There are many strategies to support creating this resilient supply chain including the GE Port Optimizer which is one of the most innovative and expansive technology projects taken on by the ports.  Check out the video on this project:

What Should We Consider and/or What Impacts Could Arise?

The GE Port Optimizer project is an excellent example of the importance of collaboration, the strategic use of data and the impact of the customer experience on creating a resilient supply chain.  Have you thought about how to collaborate with your extended supply chain and related partners for a win-win-win? If you aren’t, your competitor will. Stranger and perhaps smarter yet, have you thought about collaborating with your competitor for a win-win?  

Creating collaborative partnerships of data, visibility and efficiency is a great example of creating a resilient supply chain to navigate disruption and achieve peak performance. Check out our new video and article series as well as our soon-to-be offered Rapid Resilient Supply Chain Assessment service:



The Resilient Supply Chain: Do You Have Vendors or Partners?

December 1st, 2018

Since we did research on “The Squeeze” for a speech on the the squeeze in aerosapce (meaning:  how does the supplier in the middle between the Tier 1 suppliers who supply final assembly parts for an airplane and the powerhouse mills survive, or preferably thrive), we have been thinking a lot about the supplier relationship.  Coincidently, we also heard a lot on this topic at the Association for Supply Chain Management (ASCM/APICS) international conference as it is a hot topic across all industries. There was an almost identical discussion occurring with retail and the consumer goods industry. Last but not least, all of our clients are seeing the relevance of this topic.

What is the “right” answer?  Of course, it depends!
To manage “the squeeze”, one of the keys is to create partnerships with your key suppliers.  The rest can be vendors since they are not core or significant to your success. However, your key suppliers must be partners and collaborators.  For example, one of the best ways to handle the middle position in the aerospace world is to bring your customers and their demand together with your suppliers and their capabilities.  

Here are a few ideas that all depend on being a partner:

  • Collaborate with suppliers on new ideas/design concepts to reduce materials and waste for you AND up your supply chain.
  • Become a partner of your customer and gain access to demand information as it becomes available and help translate that into a benefit for your customer, you and your supplier.
  • Leverage pricing and volume across the supply chain for a win-win-win.

Although these ideas relate to aerospace, the same concept applies with every client.  When I was VP of Operations and Supply Chain for an absorbent products manufacturer, we used these same concepts to find win-win-win solutions in your supply chain.  We partnered with key vendors to redesign materials (that performed better at a lower cost), redesign packaging, reduce waste in our manufacturing process which required teaks and collaboration with both material and equipment suppliers and more.  By following a partnership route instead of the “vendor” negotiation/beat up on price route, we turned our situation around from bad to good.

We found private equity backers who wanted profitable growth.  However, soon after, the market changed and oil and gas prices were continually rising which significantly impacted our material costs (and were unavoidable) while our private equity investors still expected the same profit improvements as before.  Our business was also heavy in transportation cost since the product was bulky which was also an issue with rising oil and gas prices. Thus, we collaborated with customers, material suppliers and freight suppliers for win-win-win solutions. It “worked” and we were able to offset the price increases while growing the business in a profitable and scalable way.

These types of situations are common in today’s business environment.  

Do you view your suppliers as vendors or partners? And who are you hiring to manage these relationships?  Transaction-oriented purchasing folks or strategic relationship procurement resources?

 



When is it the ‘Right’ Time for a Supply Chain Network Assessment?

September 4th, 2018

Supply Chain networks that are not set up to support scalable, profitable growth have a high likelihood of negatively impacting your customers, impeding your growth and consuming far more resources than they were ever imagined to sustain.  What is ideally mapped out one year is likely to change the next in today’s Amazonian marketplace. Thus, assessing your supply chain network from your suppliers’ suppliers through your manufacturing and logistics networks to your customers’ customers with an eye to customers, cost and cash will undoubtedly yield results.  

What are some hints to know when it’s the ‘right’ time?

  1.  Renew your lease, buy or move? – As your lease comes due, it is a natural time to re-evaluate your supply chain network to make sure you are positioned ideally to support your customer base at maximum value for your customers and your organization.
  2.  Cost considerations – As you think about how to reduce your cost base, re-evaluating your supply chain network is a ‘must’.  Most likely, you can save a few pennies here or there.  But, for substantial savings, you may need to review your infrastructure.
  3.  Customer demands – In today’s Amazonian environment, customer demands are ever-increasing.  Is your supply chain network positioned to support your customers’ needs, delivery points and sales growth expectations?
  4.  Space constraints – As you start to think about space, it might be an opportune time to re-evaluate your supply chain network.  First, do you know how much space is needed to support your growth plans (and where)? Do you have the opportunity to maximize space?  Or should you re-position?
  5.  Insourcing/ outsourcing– As you think about whether you should insource, outsource (ex. 3PL) or utilize a combination of both, it is definitely an opportune time to evaluate your supply chain network and logistics infrastructure.
  6.  Supply chain partners – If you are re-evaluating key supply chain partners, it is likely a good time to do a quick assessment of your supply chain network.   

We have found that a supply chain network assessment can be valuable even if you decide not to change a thing.  Performing a quick review of customers, suppliers, operations and logistics infrastructure from a customer, cost and cash flow viewpoint can provide substantial benefit every so often.  Contact us if you’d like to talk further.



Manufacturing Expert, Lisa Anderson, Presents 2018 LMA Advocate Award to Aerospace Executive, Kelly Ford

July 28th, 2018

CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA – July 27, 2018 –  Manufacturing and Supply Chain Expert,  Lisa Anderson, MBA, CSCP, CLTD, president of LMA Consulting Group Inc., presented the 2018 LMA Advocate Award to Aerospace/Defense executive, Kelly Ford.

“It is a pleasure to recognize Kelly Ford with our 2018 LMA Advocate Award.  We have worked on many projects together at three separate aerospace firms.  I appreciate the relationship we have built and the collaboration that has made our projects successful” Ms. Anderson commented. LMA Consulting Group works with clients on manufacturing strategy and end-to-end supply chain transformation that maximizes the customer experience and enables profitable, scalable, dramatic business growth.

Kelly and I have achieved significant results together – improved customer service levels to support business growth, expanded capacity and efficiencies, and right-sized inventory levels to maximize the use of cash and capital. Most importantly, we engaged and valued the opinions of the most important asset of the firm – the people. It turns a project into a fascinating puzzle, making it fun” she continued.

Inspired by the outcomes of client projects, LMA Consulting solicits client feedback, ideas and trend information.  In turn, the firm adopts and incorporates key learnings, makes continuous improvements and expands service offerings to continually raise the bar in meeting evolving client needs. Advocates, partners and centers of influence are key to LMA Consulting’s continued growth and success, as they work together to advance manufacturing and the global supply chain.

“Over 13 years, I have learned that it takes more than hard work and intention to affect growth.  It takes focusing on innovation every day.  LMA Advocates help us do just that and more. I am so grateful to be able to call Kelly Ford one of our LMA Consulting Group trusted advisors” she concluded.

About LMA Consulting Group – Lisa Anderson, MBA, CSCP, CLTD

Lisa Anderson is the founder and president of LMA Consulting Group, Inc., a consulting firm that specializes in manufacturing strategy and end-to-end supply chain transformation that maximizes the customer experience and enables profitable, scalable, dramatic business growth Ms. Anderson has been named a Top 40 B2B Tech Influencer by arketi group, a 50 ERP Influencer by Washington-Frank, ranked in the top 46 most influential in Supply Chain by SAP and named a top woman influencer by Solutions Review. She recently published, I’ve Been Thinking, an inspiring collection of 101 strategies for creating bold customer promises and profits. A regular content contributor on topics including supply chain, ERP and SIOP and innovation, Ms. Anderson is regularly interviewed and quoted by publications such as Industry Week, tED magazine and the Wall Street Journal.  For information, to sign up for her Profit Through PeopleTM Newsletter or for a copy of her book, visit LMA-ConsultingGroup.com.

Media Contact
Kathleen McEntee | Kathleen McEntee & Associates, Ltd. | p. (760) 262 – 4080 | KMcEntee@KMcEnteeAssoc.com



Have You Heard Horror Stories about ERP?

April 25th, 2018

enterprise resource planningSince we are known in ERP circles, it is a topic that comes up in conversation frequently.  Recently, at an Executive Forums meeting, one member talked about a situation he knew about where the company lost half its sales after a failed ERP implementation, and they ended up reverting back to their old system.  Can you imagine? The unfortunate thing is this is not uncommon although it is a more dramatic example.

ERP isn’t bad.  It is essential in achieving scalable, profitable growth although sometimes it can seem bad and have just horrible results.  

Similarly, no particular ERP system is bad; although some are definitely better for your particular situation and growth plans than others. We cringe when we hear about the plans of potential clients who were sold ‘ice to eskimos’ by ERP suppliers.  The challenge is that an ERP system can sound like a significant financial investment and so clients are tempted to not add cost by hiring an expert to assist with the process. However, since it is as significant as it is, when it goes bad, it extrapolates into many times the initial investment with unhappy customers, added cost and more.  Thus, it is no wonder clients stick with a ‘dead ERP’ longer than they should in many cases, which limits their ability to grow – and certainly achieve scalable, profitable growth.

All hope is not lost!  Here are a few things to consider when evaluating ERP and whether you should think about upgrading:  

  1.  Can you support your growth plans two years out? –  ERP isn’t something you slam in place unless you want to experience the horrific stories.  Start two years out. If you will be limiting your ability to grow profitably, it is time. It could be that you are on a system like QuickBooks, or you expect M&A activity or a potential sale, or you have a highly customized system or one that isn’t supportable two years down-the-line.
  2.  Forget about bells & whistles (cool items ERP suppliers show you) and evaluate a short list of critical success factors for your business –  This is #1 to success in evaluating ERP systems.  These critical success factors are items relevant to your profit drivers, maximizing the customer experience, unique to your industry/company, etc.  Once you identify them, tie them to functionality.
  3.  Consider your partners carefully – Although selecting the best system for your situation is cornerstone to getting the appropriate foundation on your house, if you have the wrong partner, you might as well hang up your hat.  The perfect software with the lowest cost proposal from a weaker partner will quickly surpass your highest cost proposal with a so-so partner and double it from there – at a minimum. Selecting ERP partners is quite similar to selecting any good partner – be aware you’ll be happily collaborating or stuck with them for quite a long time.

All businesses will go through ERP upgrades at least once or twice every 10-20 years (if done well, more if not).  Why not pay attention to how to make one of the most significant investments pay off?