Tag Archive: resiliency

Students & the Future of the Profession

March 22nd, 2019

In the last few weeks, our APICS Inland Empire students have been on fire! As the president of APICS Inland Empire and Chair of the MCIE (Manufacturing Council of the Inland Empire) Innovation Awards, I am absolutely thrilled to announce:

Cal Poly Pomona Global Student Challenge

Cal Poly Pomona Global Student Challenge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harvey Mudd MCIE Innovation Award

Harvey Mudd ASCM_ APICS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feeling optimistic about the future of our profession? Absolutely!

One tip to implement this week:
Who wouldn’t love to send this newsletter? We are on a roll! It certainly gives us hope and excitement about the future of our profession. As an APICS Inland Empire chapter, our Board of Directors and members collaborate closely with many student chapters (CSUSB, Cal Poly, UCR) student teams (Harvey Mudd, University of LaVerne, Drucker) and community colleges (Norco). Often, we learn more from the students than vice-versa.

Not only are they “go-getters” but they also have technical skills and can present powerfully to a mock board of directors. These students know that to succeed, they need to do things differently, think about things differently and stand out from the crowd. After all, innovation isn’t for the faint of heart! It requires failure and persistence, just the qualities that go into resiliency.

Interested in joining us? We would love to have additional participation with our students. One way you can get started is to join us at our spring executive panel and networking symposium for discussions on the topic “Talent Transformation: People or Robots?“. We always learn just as much as we share. Speaking of which, if you have a top notch executive or expert to recommend for our panel, please contact us.

 

 



The Resilient Supply Chain: Video Interview on Global Competitiveness

October 26th, 2018

To kick off our supply chain resiliency value series, we are excited to share an interview with Mirna Elnar, CEO Acura Spa Systems Inc.  Thanks to Mirna for sharing her expertise at the  APICS Inland Empire Executive Panel & Networking Symposium panel is Spring!   

Mirna is responding to a question related to supply chain resiliency.  In essence, the key question for manufacturers is how to be competitive with overseas manufacturers in low cost countries.  Clearly, we are NOT likely to be competitive on cost (especially labor cost) alone.  However, all is not lost!

In her comments, Mirna provides several ideas and strategies for how to navigate these rough waters successfully.  

                                                   

Success Responds to Resilience and Repetition
Our most successful clients build innovation into their daily routine.  It is no accident that they are the most resilient as conditions change.  In today’s Amazonian environment which is full of volatility and changing conditions, resiliency has become a “must”!

Mirna also gave a compelling story about exporting to Brazil.  Instead of giving up when she found out the tariffs were unfair, she devised a way to collaborate with a company in Brazil and find a win-win opportunity.  We walked away thinking if she could turn an unfair advantage into an opportunity, why aren’t we looking further for these innovative ideas?

 



The Resilient Supply Chain: Do You Have Resilient Employees?

October 24th, 2018

Resiliency isn’t easy,  If it were, every organization would have already perfected it.  Yet, in today’s volatile, Amazon impacted, disruption-heavy environment, you must build resilience.  

What is Resilience
Let’s start by talking about our meaning of resilience.  In addition to having the ability to adjust and recover quickly to changing business conditions.  A company must also have the capability to proactively think through the most likely disruptors and develop strategies to thrive amidst the chaos.   

Are your employees resilient?
If a customer changes his mind, how does your team handle it?  Do they see it as a challenge or a chore? Do they complain or start asking questions to understand what’s behind the change and whether it is likely to impact future orders?  Do they communicate upstream and downstream so all parties are in the loop and aware of what is coming?

If a supplier runs into a capacity issue and is late to deliver, what do your employees do?  Actually, let’s back up – do they know about the delay in advance? If so, has it been communicated?  What approach is taken with the supplier in these circumstances? Do you know whether your demands are realistic or not?  Or are you overloading your low cost supplier so you don’t get beat up for purchase price variances? Think about these questions and then go back to answering the resiliency question.  

Learning from Failure
Here is another key question:  What does your team do if they fail?  Do they look for the person to blame? Does the leader blame the weakest link?  Or does the leader blame “them” (next level management)? Or does the leader accept responsibility even if it isn’t his/her fault?  No matter who is at fault, how does the team react? Do they jump on the situation and look for solutions? Will they be more likely or less likely to collaborate upstream or downstream to find answers or ideas to test?  Perhaps most importantly, will they hide under a rock or spur into action?


Start by understanding your resiliency culture.  Then, you can purposefully change it to focus on resiliency.