Tag Archive: Society for the Advancement of Consulting

What is at the Cross-Section of Success?

March 4th, 2019

In thinking about the tours and events in which we’re recently participated, spoken or led, the audience represented a great cross-section of manufacturing and logistics industries, as well as company size:

  • Professional Women in Healthcare – spoke on the Amazon Effect
  • Aerospace & Defense Forum – spoke on the resilient supply chain
  • Anti-seminar themed Executive Luncheon – was a panelist on the topic of increasing demand
  • CSCMP state of the industry event – listened to the president of CSCMP discuss the latest statistics and timely topics in logistics
  • ProVisors manufacturers and distributors event – featuring a City National Bank expert discussing an economic forecast
  • The Founder of the UGG brand – talking about how he created the UGG brand and grew the company from the back of his van to what it is today
  • Tours of UPS, Amazon, Pacific Mountain Logistics, Shamrock Foods, Goodwill, Lifestream, ESRI and more.
  • Meetings with 9 academic institutions in the Inland Empire and surrounding areas
  • Harvey Mudd executive roundtable event –  M&A and preparing for sale
  • Webinars with APICS-IE on IoT and with the Society for the Advancement of Consulting on overcoming obstacles, leveraging PR and more.
  • And more…

So, what is at the cross-section of ALL of these tours, events and/or interactions?

The need for a resilient end-to-end supply chain!

What is in common is the sheer amount of volatility and disruption. Whether the disruptor or the disrupted, entire industries are transforming the way business is done. Some are preparing to have artificial intelligence and automation take over. For example, according to research performed at the University of Redlands, 60%+ of jobs are subject to automation by 2025. Others are dealing with massive benefits or disruption from changes in trade, depending on their role, while others choose to ignore the hoopla and are growing while everyone else is caught up in the chaos! And, this is just the beginning. Trade wars or not, many companies are near-sourcing, and looking at additive manufacturing and vertical integration.

What’s next? If you develop a resilient supply chain, the idea is you don’t have to worry because you’ll successfully navigate disruption to achieve peak performance. Contact us if you’d like to find out how to create a resilient supply chain.

Did you like this article? Continue reading on this topic:

Eagle Eye Strategic Focus

What’s Ahead for Supply Chain?

Collaboration in the Supply Chain

 



Disruption, Innovation, Global Trends & the APICS-IE Symposium

November 20th, 2018

Lately, I’ve attended various conferences and participated in a few events/ panels on a diverse set of topics with different groups (ranging from transportation to public policy to manufacturing and supply chain to consulting to universities/ students to women leaders).  Aside from it being a whirlwind of fascinating conversations, I’ve seen a few themes emerge across every one of these events – disruption, innovation and global trends.

In today’s Amazonian and Uberian environments, disruption is the new normal.  For example, at Mobility 21 (Southern CA transportation coalition), autonomous vehicles and Uber/Lyft type transportation/trucking concepts arose.  At the Association for Supply Chain Management (ASCM/ APICS) international conference, the idea the IoT, artificial intelligence, Netflix type disruption and more arose.  And at the Society for Advancement of Consulting local event held at Harvey Mudd, almost 50% of the attendees were originally from out of the country and key discussions occurred around global trends and disruption.

Thus, I’d be remiss if I didn’t invite you to join us at the APICS-IE executive panel & networking symposium with an amazing panel discussing “Advancing Innovation and Navigating Global Trends” on Nov 3rd at Harvey Mudd in Claremont.  Click here to learn more and register.

One tip to implement this week:
Since disruption and innovation go hand-in-hand, there are many ways to think about this topic.  One suggestion is to gather your team and business partners/trusted advisors and brainstorm about what disruptions are likely to impact your industry.  Also consider which disruptions are likely to come down the pike. Understanding your environment and how you are positioned is a great starting point – and you’ll be better off than most organizations who might already be known in innovation circles to repeat this exercise on some sort of regular basis!

Additionally, join our unique networking and educational event on “Advancing Innovation and Navigating Global Trends”.  We have an amazing panel including the deputy executive director of the port of Los Angeles, the COO of the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), the Chairman/Dept of Surgery at the City of Hope, a senior executive in aerospace and a senior director of supply chain & operations.  It should stir up some really engaging discussions on innovation and global trends! The event is on Nov 3rd in Claremont, CA from 8-11:30am. I hope to see you there.  Learn more and register.

 



My 5-City Cross-Country Trip & the Value of Collecting Good People

November 4th, 2018

 

When I was young, I had a doll collection of the nationalities of my family.  I no longer collect dolls, cats or mystery novels but I have upgraded to collecting “good people”.  Luckily, I have always appreciated “good people” and I’ve stayed in touch.

Over the years, I was amazed and thrilled how many benefits came from this way of looking at life and career.  Last week, I was on an 8-night, 5-stop, cross-country journey where I interacted with some of these “good people” and it made me think…..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I started in:
1) Arizona to see my Mom and family
2) Chicago for the Association for Supply Chain Management where I collaborated with
LMA Associates, clients, APICS Inland Empire global student case competition finalists from Harvey Mudd, a CSUSB professor and contingent of transportation-related business owners from China and met several new colleagues
3) New York to lead the
Society for Advancement of Consulting annual meeting with my business partner, Linda Popky
4) Atlanta to meet with Georgia Tech and
IEEP colleagues
5) Palm Springs to meet with Renaissance Executive Forums CEOs  

Although exhausted, it did make me think about this concept of “collecting good people”.  Do you collect good people?

One tip to implement this week:
FAR more important than collecting industry trends, company history, technical skills and anything else, GOOD PEOPLE are the most valuable.  You meet people in all walks of life from college to colleagues at a job to customers and suppliers you might interact with along the way to industry and trade groups you participate with and much more.  I’ve found that there are “good people” all along the way. Sometimes, it just takes recognizing them. As life changes, keep in touch. It is easier today than ever before with social media.

When I first started on Linked In, I found the daughter of my first boss from Coca-Cola in order to re-connect with my first boss as well as her daughter (as we worked together briefly near the end).  I am really glad I did as they are definitely in the “good people” category. Other “good people” have become LMA Associates. Others have become clients.  And, others have become trusted colleagues and so on.  

No matter what happens in the future, wouldn’t you rather keep in touch with the “good people” throughout your life? It certainly makes it richer!

 



The Resilient Supply Chain: Are You the Disrupted or the Disruptor?

November 1st, 2018

At the Association for Supply Chain Management’s (ASCM/APICS) International Conference, almost every presenter mentioned disruption.  It is prevalent in today’s Amazonian, technology-ridden environment.  

Similarly, after attending APICS, I flew to lead the annual meeting for the Society for the Advancement of Consulting. During the first lunch, my colleagues spent the entire time discussing disruption.  One (a former Apple executive) lives it daily and coaches executives on disruption.  Another is a leadership expert who sees the significance and is writing a book on disruptors.  Interesting!

In the interim, we have dealt with a few client challenges – guess what?  You got it. They relate to disruption! And last but not least, the next leg of my trip was entirely about disruption.  Technology has the potential to vastly impact manufacturing and distribution jobs, so it makes a lot of sense to find a proactive approach instead of playing the victim.  

According to a proactive CPA partner, artificial intelligence (AI) is going to transform the industry.  According to a healthcare expert, it has vast potential to disrupt the healthcare industry. Gartner thinks 33% of all occupations will be performed by smart robots by 2025.  Forrester Research says AI will take over up to 16% of jobs in the U.S. And, if that wasn’t shocking enough, Google thinks                                                                     robots will achieve human intelligence levels by 2029.  

So, do you want to be the disrupted or the disruptor? We choose disruptor!

Since I had lunch with two disruption experts, I asked the critical question:  Can we learn to become a disruptor? The great news is that it is possible! Start paying attention to disruptors.  What do they do differently? What would you like to emulate? You don’t have to do exactly what they do. Find your own path but look for commonalities.  One of our colleagues is writing a book on this exact subject. When it comes out, we’ll pass it along.

In the interim, start asking a few questions….

 



Do You Give Back?

September 27th, 2018

We are all so busy that it can be hard to find time to give back.  Yet, the future of our profession, future leaders and our region is at stake.  Making this a priority during your day may not be as difficult as you think.

Choose a way that works for you.
Some people prefer to donate time.  Others prefer to donate money. And others donate expertise.

 I started this journey because one of my colleagues, Ellen Kane, who has to be one of the most helpful people I know (and therefore there is no way to say no to such a wonderful person) asked me to participate with the first APICS Western region student case competition (with just a hand full of students from three colleges).  Fast-forward 10+ years….  We led the competitions together with over 100 students from universities around the globe (from the western region of the U.S. to Canada to China and beyond).

To give an idea of the types of activities you might get involved with in your profession, community or with future leaders, here are the giving back priorities of LMA Consulting:  

1) Manufacturing/ Supply Chain Community

2) Southern CA Community  

3) Students and the future of the profession

  

 

 

 

 

Within these categories, here are some of the examples of our activities.  Hopefully they will prompt ideas for you:

  1. IEEP (Inland Empire Economic Partnership) and IEGO (Inland Economic Growth & Opportunity):  We focus on advancing supply chain and advanced manufacturing in Inland Southern California to contribute to the economy of the area.
  2. MCIE (Manufacturing Council of the Inland Empire):  Certainly this group also has a focus on manufacturing in Inland Southern California to contribute to the economy of the area.  For MCIE, we lead the Innovation Awards and partner and recognize manufacturing in the region.
  3. APICS Inland Empire & Universities/ Colleges in the I.E.: APICS is the leading trade association for supply chain and operations professionals.  Our goal is to provide value to manufacturers and distributors in the area as well as to students/future leaders (Harvey Mudd, Cal Poly Pomona, CSUSB, UCR, University of LaVerne, Drucker & Norco College).  
  4.  Student internships & mentoring (Pomona College & the Drucker School): We also partner with students at Pomona College to provide internships in research and business topics and with students at the Drucker School to mentor women in supply chain.  
  5. University of LaVerne Board of Advisors:  As part of this role, our goal is to advise the business school, participate with the CEO Summit and contribute to the committee focused on advancing women in the business school.

One of the best pieces of advice we’ve received is to start small.  You can make a difference by giving back in a small way and expand where it makes sense for you.  There are no competitions when it comes to giving back. Do it in a way that makes sense to you. It doesn’t matter what anyone else thinks.  Also, you might have completely different interests. For example, my business partner in the Society for the Advancement of Consulting contributes by volunteering for an association that focuses on diabetes.  I have colleagues who give back by taking care of aging parents.  

No matter your interests, it is likely to give you a bit of diversity in your life.