Tag Archive: suppliers

What’s Going on in Supply Chain: Shark Bite Biz Video

September 8th, 2020

David Strausser, podcast host of Shark Bite Biz, and I talk about what’s going on in supply chain. We talk e-commerce, customers’ customers, suppliers’ suppliers, what our most successful clients are doing currently, the pareto principle and more. Listen to our episode (after a short advertisement).

 

       

What Should We Consider and/or What Impacts Could Arise?
Although there are many steps every manufacturer or distributor should take during these unprecedented times, there are a few critical and common steps everyone should pursue. At a minimum, immediately address the following:

  1. Your customers’ customers – Understand your demand, changing buying behaviors, changing product and service needs, etc.
  2. Your suppliers’ suppliers – Understand your supply capabilities, your suppliers and suppliers’ suppliers cash positions, risks, ability to innovate, etc.
  3. Don’t forget your internal operations – The equivalent of your customers’ customers’ view of your operations, capacity, staffing flexibility, skills, etc.
  4. Frequent touch points – Demand and supply (SIOP), employees, customers and suppliers
  5. Sync up with your strategy – Are you still going in the “right’ direction? Think about rapid and agile strategy.
  6. Innovate – Only those that innovate thrive. During these unprecedented times, successful companies will pull away from the pack by innovating.

Read more about these types of topics in my eBook,  Future-Proofing Manufacturing & Supply Chain Post COVID-19. Gain ideas and strategies to successfully emerging from coronavirus and thrive long-term. If you are interested in doing an assessment and rapid roadmap tailored to your company, please contact us about this new service offering.

Please share your stories, challenges, ideas and successes.



Manufacturing Expert, Lisa Anderson, Notes Workforce Talent and Suppliers are Critical to Stabilizing the Supply Chain

August 24th, 2020

CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA – August 24, 2020 –  Manufacturing and Supply Chain Expert,  Lisa Anderson, MBA, CSCP, CLTD, president of LMA Consulting Group Inc., tells companies to recognize  workforce talents and take time to partner with the right suppliers. LMA Consulting Group works with manufacturers and distributors on strategy and end-to-end supply chain transformation to maximize the customer experience and enable profitable, scalable, dramatic business growth.

“Stabilizing the supply chain has been critical these last few months for manufacturers and distributors.  This has been necessary to minimize volatility and keep goods flowing, in turn, fulfilling customer expectations. Customers understand that these are different times, but they will be patient only so long.  That is why it is critical to get the supply chain stabilized,” Ms. Anderson explained.

In past communications, Ms. Anderson has suggested understanding demand by connecting with both the customer and the customers’ customers.  She has also discussed realigning demand with supply through the SIOP process (Sales, Inventory and Operations Planning). Yet, the most critical component in solving problems, disruptions or even expansion of the supply chain is a company’s talent. “I often ask our clients who in the organization, which disciplines and levels, is involved in the SIOP process and collaboration with customers and suppliers. If the answer is simply Supply Chain or Operations, they are missing out on solutions that their talent can bring to the table, and even more concerning is the potential loss of talent due to the lack of involvement in meaningful activities. I also ask about the depth of talent and cross-functional capabilities within a discipline. This is telling, especially when complex solutions are required to satisfy key customer requirements or resolve a situation within the supply chain.  And, one of my final questions lies in the determining the kinds of relationships the company has with suppliers.  Employees and suppliers can create new solutions or products and be champions of an organization,” she continued.

With high levels of ambiguity and volatility, the leader’s role is more important than ever. Ms. Anderson suggests three ways to immediately leverage talent to stabilize the supply chain. “Talent is key to stabilizing the supply chain. 1) Get your salespeople and your customers involved in the forecasting process. Sales tends to be on the outskirts of demand and supply. They need to be as involved and accountable in the demand planning and fulfillment phase as they are in generating orders. 2). To stabilize internal operations, fill gaps and keep teams focused on the customer while maximizing efficiency, formal and informal leaders must monitor progress, adjust plans and stay on top of morale, training and developmental needs. 3) Do not assume the past will repeat. Deep dive into critical supplier relationships and future viability. Make sure you have the right supplier partners, not simply the least costly vendors, and track progress frequently. And, make sure you do not have all of your eggs in one supplier basket” she concluded.

Ms. Anderson recently released a short video, What’s Happening in Manufacturing & Supply Chain: Consider Your Top Talent. Ms. Anderson has also released, Future-Proofing Manufacturing & the Supply Chain Post COVID-19, an eBook that provides practical go-forward insights, advice and experiential value.

 About LMA Consulting Group – Lisa Anderson, MBA, CSCP, CLTD

Lisa Anderson is the founder and president of LMA Consulting Group, Inc., a consulting firm that specializes in manufacturing strategy and end-to-end supply chain transformation.  She focuses on maximizing the customer experience and enabling profitable, scalable, dramatic business growth. Ms. Anderson is a recognized Supply Chain thought leader by SelectHub, named a Top 40 B2B Tech Influencer by arketi group, 50 ERP Influencer by Washington-Frank, a top 46 most influential in Supply Chain by SAP and named a top woman influencer by Solutions Review. She recently published, I’ve Been Thinking, 101 strategies for creating bold customer promises and profits. A regular content contributor on topics including a superior customer experience with SIOP, advancing innovation and making the supply chain resilient, Ms. Anderson is regularly interviewed and quoted by publications such as Industry Week, tED magazine and the Wall Street Journal.  For information, to sign up for her Profit Through PeopleTM Newsletter or for a copy of her book, visit LMA-ConsultingGroup.com.                                       

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Media Contact
Kathleen McEntee | Kathleen McEntee & Associates, Ltd. | p. (760) 262 – 4080 | KMcEntee@KMcEnteeAssoc.com



What’s Going on in the World of ERP & Business Intelligence?

July 16th, 2020

How Do ERP Systems Work?

I am excited to be featured in SelectHub’s extremely popular and recently updated article, “How Do ERP Systems Work?“. It provides a good foundation into the world of ERP and what you’d do with an ERP system. Although most clients have an ERP system of some type, by NO means do they understand how ERP systems work and the true value of an ERP system.

Perhaps we should spend more time understanding such a critical topic. After all, an ERP system upgrade will be one of the most significant projects your company will embark upon. Although the financial commitment is substantial, the resource commitment is far greater! On the other hand, if you bury your head in the sand too long, your risk will rise to unacceptable levels and your customers’ needs will not be supported.

Naturally, since the pandemic hit, many ERP projects have come to a grinding halt because the first thought is to conserve cash. However, in surveying ERP suppliers supporting clients ranging from small and medium size closely-held businesses to private equity backed companies and large complex organizations, although there has been a slowdown, there are several clients taking the opportunity to get in front of the technology curve so that they will be ready to grow rapidly and profitably as they emerge from the pandemic. They are slowing down some areas of the project while focusing efforts on the critical functionality or areas of the business that need a technology boost. For example, we are working with a client who took the opportunity to develop an IT roadmap so that they’ll be prepared to succeed post COVID-19. To think through your options further, listen to a SelectHub panel discussion on “How to Do ERP During COVID-19“. We are interested in your feedback and stories.

One area that is of common interest is business intelligence (BI) software. If clients can slice and dice data to understand customer and inventory patterns, utilize predictive analytics to better navigate COVID-19 demand changes and support future customer needs, and develop operational dashboards to manage performance and take cost out of the business, what’s not to like? In reviewing the spectrum of available options, there are a few impressive, relatively easy-to-implement tools. Clients are interested in what will deliver immediate value.

Read our eBook, Future-Proofing Manufacturing & Supply Chain Post COVID-19 to dig into these concepts further as well as to start thinking through your technology roadmap.

Did you like this article?  Continue reading on this topic:

Blockchain, IoT, Big Data. Will Anything Stick?

 



JIT Might Not Be What it is Cracked Up to Be?!

April 2nd, 2020

Just-in-time might not be what it is cracked up to be! Certainly, the coronavirus impacts should give us reason to question this rule at face value. Are you running so tight that you only have one bin, pallet or small supermarket to keep your facility running? If so, the question extends to your end-to-end supply chain.

Let’s assume you are a critical manufacturer struggling to produce key items during this coronavirus pandemic. Your suppliers should not be on lockdown since they support a critical infrastructure business; however, that doesn’t mean you’ll be fine. There are many considerations to review:

  1. Source of supply: Are your suppliers located in Asia and unable to staff during the peak of the coronavirus? Do you know what type of delays you’ll experience? Do your suppliers have contingency plans?
  2. Your suppliers’ suppliers: Even if you have a good handle on your suppliers, do you know the status of your suppliers’ suppliers? In an interconnected supply chain, we are only as strong as our weakest link. Who is your weakest link?
  3. Your transportation infrastructure: Even if your suppliers have product, can it get to you? Within what timeframe?
  4. Backups: No matter how well you’ve planned, the question is whether you have backups for critical materials/ ingredients that will ramp up rapidly as needed. Hopefully your supply chain is diversified geographically.
  5. Your customers: Are you in lockstep with your customers so that you are proactively managing demand or are peaks and valleys a surprise? Of course, the coronavirus was unexpected but the degree you fully understand your customers will determine your reaction time to changes in demand.
  6. Positioning of inventory: Do you have critical inventory positioned throughout your end-to-end supply chain?
  7. Your digital supply chain: Are you able to see into your extended supply chain? It could provide quite a benefit at this point.
  8. Additive manufacturing & robotics: Are you able to keep running with less people, socially distanced people and/or print on demand?

Using JIT (or any concept for that matter) without taking a 360 degree view is a bad idea! The cousin of JIT is lean manufacturing. I gained the attention of Wiley by writing that lean is just uncommon common sense (which of course simplifies it in order to make a point), but perhaps it is something to think more about. Have you put all these trendy concepts through a common sense filter? How about a risk filter? Let’s hope so! Otherwise you can be in a critical business and still not producing and running customers out of stock.

What is the answer? It depends! If you have put thought into your supply chain strategy upfront, considered risks, diversified your supplier base, invested in quality checks and top talent, and treated your employees well, it is likely your version of JIT will prove successful. On the other hand, if you saw JIT as a way to reduce inventory and were short-sighted in looking at your end-to-end supply chain and treating your employees and partners as trusted colleagues, you will likely suffer.

Getting ahead of the curve might be the only avenue to success. Consider creating a resilient supply chain and future-proofing your supply chain. Stay tuned and read more about it, and If you are interested in discussing a supply chain assessment, please contact us.

Did you like this article?  Continue reading on this topic:

Future-Proofing Your Supply Chain

The Strongest Link in Your Supply Chain



Coronavirus: Resources for Businesses & Individuals

March 20th, 2020

What else could we be thinking about this week?!?!

Of course, the coronavirus is top of mind. I met with a group of top notch trusted advisors yesterday (via Zoom) and we shared resources. We had trusted advisors including CPAs, attorneys, HR consultants, bankers, insurance providers and many more. Because it was so valuable for each of us, I wanted to share these resources with you. Click here

We will continue to add links with valuable information in each section. For example, there are articles on FAQs for employers, working remotely, how to keep your sales team motivated and several more. We will continue to add articles as well.

Now that the basics are covered, I’ll also be adding manufacturing and supply chain specific articles and videos. Stay tuned here.

One Tip to Implement This Week:
Although the news is quite unsettling, the key is to follow the guidelines for social distancing, be extra careful but do NOT stop.

Some of our clients cannot keep up with the volume (for example, food processors/manufacturing).  Some have seen a quick slow down (for example, those supporting schools).  Others are concerned with the 90-120 day likely slooooow down from China (The latest reports show that China is back up to around 50%; yet, it depends on your unique situation as some are 70-80% and others much worse) and some are seeing a mixed bag.

No matter your situation, there are strategies you could use to move forward successfully. Spring into action!

Of primary focus is to get in touch with your supply chain. Talk with customers and suppliers. Don’t just stop there. Find out about your customers’ customers and your suppliers’ suppliers. Understand your landscape and put action plans in place. There was never a better time to extend a helping hand into your supply chain. We’ll talk about many more actions in a special series to be launched in the next few days but start here.

Last but not least, it is a stressful time for many and please try to remember with each interaction!