Tag Archive: TST

Lisa Anderson to Speak at Premier Project Management Association

September 9th, 2016
Lisa Anderson

Lisa Anderson, a sought after speaker in the supply chain industry, will present “The Amazon Effect: Creating a Customer Service Edge to the Inland Empire Chapter of the Project Management Institute.

LMA Consulting Group’s Lisa Anderson to Present The Amazon Effect: Creating a Customer Service Edge at 2016 PMICIE Professional Development Day

Lisa Anderson MBA,CSCP, president of LMA Consulting Group, will speak to the Project Management Institute (PMI) – Inland Empire Chapter on Saturday, September 10, 2016, 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM at the Magic Lamp Inn in Rancho Cucamonga, Calif. about the importance of customer service. Anderson, a sought after speaker on supply chain, customer service, skills gap, ERP, SIOP, and the Amazon Effect and its impact on business operations of manufacturers and distributors, will be presenting “The Amazon Effect: Creating a Customer Service Edge” to professionals focused on improving project results.

Anderson is board approved in supply chain strategy, an advisory board member for the Advanced Supply Chain Certification program, and was named a top 100 supply chain blogger on SupplyChainOpz. Recognized as the 16th most influential person in supply chain management and sustainability by technology leader SAP’s “Top 46 Resource and Optimizations Influencers (Plus a Few Others),” she will present primary research on how Amazon is impacting businesses and elevating customer expectations as well as provide key strategies on where and how to make improvements to stay competitive and relevant to customers. Anderson frequently discusses how customer service is core to business success and explains how her proprietary process TST helps companies provide exceptional service including short lead times to support business growth while achieving bottom line results when looking across companies from small to large and spanning diverse industries such as aerospace, building products and food.

“I think it is imperative that companies step up their game when it comes to customer service. Providing rapid turnaround times, 24/7 accessibility and value-add service options has become the norm,” explains LMA Consulting President Lisa Anderson. “Our research bears out these facts, and it is time to light a fire under companies to dump a one-size-fits-all strategy and shift to the 1:1 customer experience.”

Anderson will be presenting along with Brian Dreyer, CSM, CSP, an Enterprise Agile Coach, and Dustin Fennell, a transformation technologist, at The California Inland Empire Chapter (PMICIE), the area’s premier project management association, committed to the advancement of the project management profession. Registration for 2016 PMICIE Professional Development Day is free for members and $70 for non-members.

Celebrating its eleventh year, LMA Consulting Group helps growing companies elevate overall business performance while creating a customer service edge. Through a number of proven proprietary processes, LMA Consulting Group can pinpoint areas for improvement with eagle eye precision and develop the strategies to deliver results. Anderson, also known as The Manufacturing ConnectorSM, is currently working on a book entitled “The Amazon Effect” detailing a business roadmap to thriving in an ultra-competitive marketplace. A regular content contributor in topics including supply chain, ERP and SIOP, she has been interviewed for articles in publications like Industry Week, tED Magazine and the Wall Street Journal. She actively posts educational blogs three times weekly and has two newsletters, Profit through PeopleSM and “I’ve Been Thinking.” For information about Lisa Anderson, go to https://www.lma-consultinggroup.com/ or call 909.630.3943.



People, People, & People

July 26th, 2016
who is on your team

Your rate of success with customer service, increasing revenue, developing new products and gaining a competitive advantage all depends on people and who you have on your team.

In real estate, almost everyone knows that location, location, location is the name of the game. The best house in the wrong location will not sell. It is imperative to pay attention to location. The same holds true in business success — it is all about people, people, and people. Who do you have on your team?

Lately, in today’s Amazon-impacted business environment, we’ve been working with a few clients to rapidly increase service levels — to maintain happy customers, to grow the business, to gain a competitive advantage and for many more reasons. The degree and speed of success stems directly back to people. Of course, processes matter, skills development matters, systems and organizations matter; however, the 80/20 of success goes to people.

For example, in one case, we were making progress but not nearly as quickly as desired. A new leader showed up on the scene and suddenly progress kicked into high gear — and success started to follow.

Similarly, one of the key factors of our new proprietary process, TST for driving supply chain performance is torque. In our example above, the leader kicked up the torque, and we kept an eye on speed and traction. Results followed. Knowing which lever to pull — and when to pull it — is the key to success.

Although this example related to a new leader, we find that success doesn’t always require new leaders. For example, we can provide countless examples of empowering already-existing leaders in driving success. Identifying exceptional people — and leaders — is cornerstone to achieving success. Of course, identifying them is not enough. Similarly to identifying a root cause to a problem, the identification alone will achieve nothing.

We cannot tell you how many clients we’ve worked with that know their problems and understand their opportunities yet made little to no progress when it came to the rubber hitting the road. Thus, once you’ve identified high potential people, empower them and get out of their way. Provide tools, training and support for roadblocks. Success will follow.

The bottom line is that PEOPLE will ensure that your bottom line hits your objectives.

 

Did you like this article? Continue reading on how to Profit Through People:

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The Elements of Project Success: A Case Study

July 21st, 2016
project success

The common factors leading to a project’s success include leadership, support, and management. Clear your team’s path with sufficient attention to these areas for the results you want.

After leading hundreds of projects and participating with hundreds more, I’ve looked for what created project success.

In this case study of project success, we asked questions: What was in common among the projects? Did the project teams do something in particular? Were they a certain type of project? Did the project sponsor do something unique? Did it matter if they crossed departments, organizations or parts of the world? Certainly, there had to be common traits that seemed to lead to project success – what were they?

The most common factors determining success – achieving project results on time, on budget and on target – include the following:

  • Project leader: Every truly successful project had a project leader who was effective. Not all were spectacular, but each one was effective in leading the project team. The project leader was respected by the team. In order to be respected, the project leader included the project team in the process, worked issues as they arose, was willing to push back as required, and was an effective leader overall.
  • Executive sponsor support: Not every project had a sponsor; actually most didn’t have a specific executive sponsor; however, they all had someone in some sort of position of authority who supported the project at critical junctures. This could be at the start – in essence, the project supporter got the ball rolling for the project. Or, it could have been related to a roadblock – the project supporter helped the team work through the roadblock. Or, it could be that the project supporter was a cheerleader for the project team or with the executive team to keep the momentum flowing.
  • Celebrate successes: A seemingly fluffy topic that was in common with the project successes was the celebration of success for wins along the way. Certainly, quick wins get the project off to a solid start and creates momentum. Most successful projects focused on creating quick wins – small is fine so long as it can create momentum. For example, my firm just introduced a proprietary process for driving supply chain performance called TST – achieving the right combination of torque, speed, and traction to drive performance. The torque component is vital. If you have speed and traction without torque, you have a slow start. As good as the team might be, if they get out of the blocks slow, it is a long, slow road to get to the finish line.
  • Critical path timeline: Although not all successful projects had a project timeline, every successful project had some sort of critical path timeline. In essence, the team understood what tasks were most critical, what sequence to complete these tasks and what handoffs were required along the way. When thinking about my TST process, this is the traction component. Steering towards the finish line is essential. Have you ever seen someone seemingly achieving victories and move quickly, just to find out they took the wrong turn? This certainly arises with project failures.

Most project teams that experienced failure got sidetracked in lengthy project tasks – some even followed up profusely on these tasks; however, the tasks were not necessarily those on the critical path timeline. In essence, they took several wrong turns, even though they were working hard and efficiently tracking task progress. From the technical point-of-view, I’ve found this to be the 80/20 of success! Put your follow-up and communication efforts here.

  • Speed: Certainly the third component of my TST process is a key to success with projects – and, I find it is one of the most common elements of success specifically in today’s new Amazon-impacted world. Unfortunately, if you get side-tracked with too much analysis, too much debate, and discussion on team objectives, too many conflicts over resources and the like, you slow down progress. Yet in today’s world, customers expect immediate service, 24/7 accessibility and quick access to the required information. If you are missing speed, you will be passed up by your competition driving in the fast lane!
  • Communication: This almost goes without saying as communication, communication, communication is as critical as “location, location, location” in real estate. Not only does the project team need to know why they are focusing on the project, who owns which task, with whom they should interact and collaborate in order to be successful, and to whom they should hand-off as the next critical path task, but they need to communicate with all related parties frequently. These should include the project sponsor, managers who need to support their efforts with resources and in communications, etc.

I’ve found these types of trends to be a strong indicator for success. Thus, make a deliberate effort to create your next project with these success traits, and I have no doubt you’ll be delighted with your project outcomes. Give it a shot and report back with your struggles and successes. Building on strengths and success is the best way to breed success.

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The Importance of Controlled Speed

June 24th, 2016

supply chain

Last week I was in New Zealand, and I went on a wild ride on the Dart River (see below). We went at 100 kph with just 4 inches of water. It was a thrilling ride with amazing scenery in the background, and it got me thinking about the critical importance of speed in today’s workplace. EVERY single one of my clients must grow, improve service levels, reduce lead time, maximize margins, and improve efficiencies — YESTERDAY. Speed of results is of the essence. It has been the focus of my clients since the recession (as cash was the focus during the recession) — in today’s Amazon-impacted workplace, speed will make or break success.

However, if you are going at 100 kph in an uncontrolled fashion, you will end up smashed directly into a boulder in the Dart River. In business, it is no different — you must maintain CONTROL while moving rapidly or success will not follow. This is one of the tenets of my proprietary process for driving supply chain performance TST. Having speed and torque with no traction leads to spinning your wheels. It is often the reason I’m called into a client.

speed

 

One tip to implement this week:

I’ve found the first step is to understand and create urgency around your priorities. Most likely you are doing a task because you want to serve a customer as almost everything we do at work can be traced back to serving customers; no matter the task — if you don’t think what you are doing ties to a customer, contact me. I bet we can tie it to a customer or drop it from your priority list. These customer-centric tasks are critical. This doesn’t mean you have to serve customers blindly but to serve them well while achieving a win-win profit and business growth requires you to work with controlled speed.

Start by finding the why behind your tasks this week. If there isn’t a compelling why, remove the item from your list. Focus only on those with an important why. Explain the why to your team or your manager. Create urgency. Think about the last service you received that not only provided great service but was speedy — wouldn’t you like to repeat that for your customers?

Looking for more ideas to keep your supply chain connected? Access more tips and resources on my blog. And keep connected by subscribing to my newsletter and email feed of “I’ve Been Thinking…”

 



TST to Drive Supply Chain Performance

April 12th, 2016
torque, speed, traction

LMA Consulting Group proprietary process TST combines torques, speed and traction to drive supply chain performance.

Our most successful clients are constantly thinking about where they are headed. They think about why they are going there — how does it fit with their vision? How does it have meaning for their customers? Employees? Supply chain partners?

They also think about emerging trends — what is most likely to impact their business? What do they have control over? What opportunities can they leverage? Can they turn lemons into lemonade? How?

Our role is to stay ahead of the curve so that I can help my clients achieve dramatic results. Thus, we’ve incorporated the following best practices and thinking into the development of my proprietary processes:

  • Best practices across industries (ranging from aerospace to building products to food & beverage to distribution) and company-sizes (from small, family-owned businesses to facilities and divisions of multi-billion-dollar, global enterprises).
  • Expert advice from our collaborations and alliances of clients and colleagues inclusive of top-notch trusted advisors, communities of executives and business owners, and trade association experts and professionals.
  • And, most importantly, we’ve bounced these against “what works” and is immediately pragmatic.

TST(SM) is our proprietary process that combines torque, speed and traction to drive supply chain performance.  

My consulting mentor helped me come up with TST(SM) a few years ago after listening to my strengths and results in supply chain management; however, I didn’t fully realize its brilliance until I purchased my new car in 2015 — an Audi A5 convertible. Suddenly, the “right” combination of torque, speed and traction made a lot of sense for not only driving on the road but for my clients’ success as well.

speed, torque and traction

When applying it to our clients, we’ve found that the optimal combination of these factors will make the difference between success and failure:

  • Torque – getting out of the blocks quickly. Quick wins create momentum!
  • Speed – the need for speed permeates all successful clients. Just think of leaving your competition in the dust…
  • Traction – certainly, maintaining “control” over your strategic advantage, critical success factors and profit drivers is essential to steering your organization towards sustainable success.

If you are not focused on that sweet spot, you are left with sub-optimal performance:

  • If you have torque and speed but not traction, you are spinning your wheels. How many of us feel this way?!?
  • If you have speed and traction but not torque, you will have a slow start. There is no excitement in that!
  • If you have torque and traction but not speed, you will lag behind.

Thus, the only winning combination is to be in the sweet spot of torque, speed and traction to lead the pack.

Please refer to our webpage to learn more and contact us if you are interested in leveraging TST(SM) at your organization.

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